Sightings grid

Observer: Todd Arnold

Observation Date: 11/30/18

Observation Time: 10:45 a.m.

Observation Location: Lake Massapoag

Common Name: Bald Eagle

Scientific Name: Haliaeetus leucocephalus

Comments: Large bird with white head and tail feathers spotted over Lake Massapoag. Unquestionably a bald eagle, it was seen riding the thermals before the clouds rolled in and covered the sun. Could this one be scouting a good spot to nest? Or was it just looking for something in the lake to eat?

More Information: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bald_eagle

Observer: Alison Siegel

Observation Date: 12/20/09

Observation Time: noon

Observation Location: Lakeview St.

Common Name: Bald Eagle

Scientific Name: Haliaeetus leucocephalus

Comments: While drinking hot chocolate after a morning of sledding, four of us clearly saw a bald eagle fly over our backyard. It was flying from Lake Massapoag toward the woods.

More Information: All About Birds: Bald Eagle

Observer: Bonnie Tate

Observation Date: 12/30/13

Observation Time: 3:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Massapoag

Common Name: Bald Eagle

Scientific Name: Haliaeetus leucocephalus

Comments: Eating carrion on the lake just beyond Pond St. on Massapoag Ave.

More Information: Boidnoise: Adult Bald Eagle Call

Observer: Ken Weiner

Observation Date: 2/19/10

Observation Time: 2:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Chessman Drive, Sharon

Common Name: Bald Eagle

Scientific Name: Haliaeetus leucocephalus

Comments: Definite ID from about 200 ft away. Eagle was flying. Possibly a second eagle further away. Did not get picture.

More Information: All About Birds: Bald Eagle

Observer: Ilan Fisher

Observation Date: 2/24/09

Observation Time: 3:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Lake Massapoag

Common Name: Bald Eagle

Scientific Name: Haliaeetus leucocephalus

More Information: All About Birds: Bald Eagle

Bald Eagle

Bald Eagle

Bald Eagle

 

Observer: Carol Moawed

Observation Date: 3/20/13

Observation Time: 11:15 a.m.

Observation Location: Massapoag, near entrance to community
center

Common Name: Bald Eagle

Scientific Name: Haliaeetus leucocephalus

Comments: He was flying down near the edge of lake, it looked like he was going after something on the edge of the lake. I was shocked and thrilled to see him.

More Information: Boidnoise: Adult Bald Eagle Call

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 4/2/11

Observation Time: 4:15 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond soccer field parking lot

Common Name: Bald Eagle

Scientific Name: Haliaeetus leucocephalus

Comments: Adult with white head and tail. Very distinctive!

More Information: Boidnoise: Adult Bald Eagle Call

Observer: Richard Kramer

Observation Date: 6/4/19

Observation Time: noon

Observation Location: Lake Massapoag

Common Name: Bald Eagle

Scientific Name: Haliaeetus leucocephalus

Comments: Bald eagles can live a long time. The oldest recorded bird in the wild was at least 38 years old when it was hit and killed by a car in New York in 2015. It had been banded in the same state in 1977.

The largest bald eagle nest on record, in St. Petersburg, Florida, was 2.9 meters in diameter and 6.1 meters tall. Another famous nest—in Vermilion, Ohio—was shaped like a wine glass and weighed almost two metric tons. It was used for 34 years until the tree blew down.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Ilan Fisher

Observation Date: 2/18/09

Observation Time: Early afternoon

Observation Location: Lake Massapoag across from Arboro Drive

Common Name: Bald Eagle & Deer

Scientific Name: Haliaeetus leucocephalus

Comments: A young bald eagle feeds on a deer carcass on the ice.

More Information: All About Birds: Bald Eagle

Bald Eagle & Deer

 

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/30/20

Observation Time:  4:30 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm (TTOR)

Common Name: Bald-faced Hornet

Scientific Name: Dolichovespula maculata

Comments: The bald-faced hornet is related to yellowjacket wasps, and is not a true hornet. Its colloquial names include bald hornet, white-faced hornet, white-tailed hornet, spruce wasp, blackjacket, and bull wasp.

Bald-faced hornets are social insects and are most active during the day. They live in colonies of up to 700 members. Bald-faced hornets build paper carton nests in the area of the queen’s choosing, typically three or more feet off the ground, and usually in trees, shrubs, on overhangs, utility poles, houses, sheds or other structures. These nests can be as large as 14 inches in diameter and more than 24 inches in length. The individual in the photos below seemed to be chewing at the dead wood – perhaps to make nest-building wood pulp.

Bald-faced hornets usually appear in late summer. Males emerge from unfertilized eggs and impregnate the new females for the next season at the end of the summer. The inseminated insects are the only ones that overwinter, while the remaining members of the nest die off, and the process repeats the next spring and summer. Unlike other stinging insects, bald-faced hornets do not reuse their nests season after season. The new colony members rebuild them each year from new materials.

Bald-faced hornets are aggressive and will attack anyone who invades their space, unlike other stinging insects that only rarely sting when they feel threatened. Removal of a bald-faced hornet nest is dangerous, and should be left to a professional. These hornets have smooth stingers, so they can sting repeatedly, whereas other stinging insects, like honeybees, are only able to attack once before their stinger falls off.

More Information: Wikipedia

Observer: Richard Mandell

Observation Date: November, 2018

Observation Time:  N/A

Observation Location: 280 Mountain Street

Common Name: Bald-faced Hornet

Scientific Name: Dolichovespula maculata

Comments: The bald-faced hornet is related to yellowjacket wasps, and is not a true hornet. Its colloquial names include bald hornet, white-faced hornet, white-tailed hornet, spruce wasp, blackjacket, and bull wasp.

Bald-faced hornets are social insects and are most active during the day. They live in colonies of up to 700 members. Bald-faced hornets build paper carton nests in the area of the queen’s choosing, typically three or more feet off the ground, and usually in trees, shrubs, on overhangs, utility poles, houses, sheds or other structures. These nests can be as large as 14 inches in diameter and more than 24 inches in length.

Bald-faced hornets usually appear in late summer. Males emerge from unfertilized eggs and impregnate the new females for the next season at the end of the summer. The inseminated insects are the only ones that overwinter, while the remaining members of the nest die off, and the process repeats the next spring and summer. Unlike other stinging insects, bald-faced hornets do not reuse their nests season after season. The new colony members rebuild them each year from new materials.

Bald-faced hornets are aggressive and will attack anyone who invades their space, unlike other stinging insects that only rarely sting when they feel threatened. Removal of a bald-faced hornet nest is dangerous, and should be left to a professional. These hornets have smooth stingers, so they can sting repeatedly, whereas other stinging insects, like honeybees, are only able to attack once before their stinger falls off.

More Information: Wikipedia

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/25/15

Observation Time: 2:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Town-owned land at Morse and Lakeview Streets

Common Name: Baltimore Checkerspot butterfly

Scientific Name: Euphydryas phaeton

Comments: This field experienced a population explosion of Baltimore Checkerspot butterflies. All phases could be found at the same time: eggs, caterpillars, chrysalises and adults.

More Information: Massachusetts Butterfly Club

Eggs:

Caterpillar:

Caterpillar weaving cocoon:

Chrysalis:

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/7/18

Observation Time: 2:35 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm (TTOR)

Common Name: Baltimore Checkerspot butterfly

Scientific Name: Euphydryas phaeton

Comments: I saw just one Baltimore checkerspot among other butterfly species feeding on dogbane blossoms.

More Information: Massachusetts Butterfly Club

Observer: Josh Simons

Observation Date: 11/21/12

Observation Time: 9:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill area

Common Name: Baltimore Oriole

Scientific Name: Icterus galbula

Comments: I’m told this is an immature male oriole. Unusual to see in November.

More Information: All About Birds

Baltimore Oriole

 

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/10/12

Observation Time: 7:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Dam

Common Name: Baltimore Oriole

Scientific Name: Icterus galbula

Comments: First I heard the flutelike call, and then I spotted the brilliant orange oriole in an oak tree just pushing out its first leaves of spring. Even though it was 7:00 p.m. and the sun was low, the bird fairly glowed. I wonder how such a gaudy creature manages to escape the notice of hawks.

Orioles weave hanging nests, and feed on fruit, nectar and insects. They have a counterpart in the tropics called a troupial, which is slightly larger, but sings an uncannily similar song.

More Information: All About Birds

Baltimore Oriole

Baltimore Oriole

Baltimore Oriole

Baltimore Oriole

Baltimore Oriole

 

Observer: Josh Simons

Observation Date: 5/12/20

Observation Time: 3:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill area

Common Name: Baltimore Oriole

Scientific Name: Icterus galbula

Comments: The oriole’s flutelike call is quite distinctive, once you know what to listen for.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/14/14

Observation Time: 2:20 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Baltimore Oriole

Scientific Name: Icterus galbula

Comments: Orioles weave a unique hanging nest.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/14/15

Observation Time: 6:45

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Baltimore Oriole

Scientific Name: Icterus galbula

Comments: Baltimore orioles are among the most brightly colored birds found in Sharon. They weave remarkable hanging nests.

More Information: All About Birds

baltimoreoriole

 

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/26/19

Observation Time: 3:40 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm (formerly the Kendall Estate)

Common Name: Baltimore Oriole

Scientific Name: Icterus galbula

Comments: I heard this oriole’s flutelike call before I spotted it.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/6/15

Observation Time: 2:30 p.m.

Observation Location: tree near Gavins Pond

Common Name: Baltimore Oriole

Scientific Name: Icterus galbula

Comments: I heard this oriole’s flutelike call before I spotted it. You can listen to a recording of an oriole’s song at: http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Baltimore_Oriole/sounds

 Oriole

 

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/13/19

Observation Time: 7:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Baltimore Oriole (female)

Scientific Name: Icterus galbula

Comments: Baltimore oriole females are much drabber than the bright-orange males. This acrobatic individual seemed to be eating the petals of this flowering crabapple tree.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/16/20

Observation Time: 7:35 a.m.

Observation Location: parking area at Gavins Pond soccer fields

Common Name: Baltimore Oriole (female)

Scientific Name: Icterus galbula

Comments: I spotted this female oriole as I was about to get into the car and leave. Nature finds you if you spend time outside, especially in a town like Sharon with plenty of natural open spaces and trails.

The oriole’s flutelike call is quite distinctive, once you know what to listen for.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/12/16

Observation Time: 7:50 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Baltimore Oriole

Scientific Name: Icterus galbula

Comments: Baltimore orioles are among the most brightly colored birds found in Sharon. They weave remarkable hanging nests.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/19/20

Observation Time: 11:10 a.m.

Observation Location: under the high tension lines across the street from the Gavins Pond soccer fields

Common Name: Baltimore Oriole

Scientific Name: Icterus galbula

Comments: The oriole’s flutelike call is quite distinctive, once you know what to listen for.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/4/13

Observation Time: 8:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond area

Common Name: Band-winged Meadowhawk dragonfly

Scientific Name: Sympetrum semicinctum

More Information: Wikipedia

Band-winged Meadowhawk Dragonfly

Band-winged Meadowhawk Dragonfly

Band-winged Meadowhawk Dragonfly

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/26/15

Observation Time: 4:30 p.m.

Observation Location: Town-owned land at Morse and Lakeview Streets

Common Name: Banded Hairstreak butterfly

Scientific Name: Satyrium calanus

Comments: This small butterfly was feeding on milkweed blossoms. Banded hairstreaks are very similar to striped hairstreaks. The blue marginal spot on the hind wing is capped with orange in the striped hairstreak but not in the banded hairstreak.

More Information: Massachusetts Butterfly Club

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 8/6/11

Observation Time: 8:10 a.m.

Observation Location: 4 Gavins Pond Road (back yard)

Common Name: Banded Net-Winged Beetle

Scientific Name: Calopteron discrepans

Comments: This colorful beetle is found throughout the eastern U.S. Its bright color and contrast warn predators that they taste bad if eaten.

More Information: University of Florida

Banded Net-Winged Beetle

 

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/29/14

Observation Time: 12:35 p.m.

Observation Location: stone hut by Upper Leach Pond at Borderland State Park

Common Name: Barn Swallow

Scientific Name: Hirundo rustica

Comments: Barn swallows are passerine birds, which includes more than half of all bird species. A passerine bird has three toes pointing forward and one back. This facilitates perching. The passerines form one of the most diverse terrestrial vertebrate orders, with over 5,000 identified species.

More Information: All About Birds

Barn Swallow

Barn Swallow

 

Observer: Randi Simons

Observation Date: 11/14/08

Observation Time: Mid-afternoon

Observation Location: Moose Hill Parkway, Mass. Audubon conservation land

Common Name: Barred Owl

Scientific Name: Strix varia

Comments: This owl sat on a branch close to the road for an hour or more, not bothered by people watching close by or by chickadees constantly scolding.

More Information: Cornell Lab of Ornithology “All About Birds”

Barred Owl

 

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/15/20

Observation Time: 7:45 a.m.

Observation Location: conservation land near Lakeview & Morse

Common Name: Barred Owl

Scientific Name: Strix varia

Comments: A common owl in Sharon, the barred owl’s vocalization sounds like, “Who cooks for you? Who cooks for you all?”

Barred Owls don’t migrate, and they don’t even move around very much. Of 158 birds that were banded and then found later, none had moved farther than 6 miles away.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Nancy Mollitor

Observation Date: 5/8/16

Observation Time: morning

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Barred Owl (juvenile)

Scientific Name: Strix varia

Comments: A common owl in Sharon, the barred owl’s vocalization sounds like, “Who cooks for you? Who cooks for you all?”

Barred Owls don’t migrate, and they don’t even move around very much. Of 158 birds that were banded and then found later, none had moved farther than 6 miles away.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/24/18

Observation Time: 6:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Bay-breasted Warbler

Scientific Name: Setophaga castanea

Comments: Bay-breasted warblers migrate through Sharon in May en route to their summertime breeding areas in Canada. They eat insects and spiders to keep up their energy during the long flight.

Even for experienced bird watchers, bay-breasted warblers are an unusual find. They are typically seen high up in tall trees, making good photos of them especially challenging. Populations of bay-breasted warbler appear to be decreasing throughout their range. The U.S. has seen a decline of almost 3% per year between 1966 and 2014, resulting in a cumulative decline of 74%, according to the North American Breeding Bird Survey.

More Information: All About Birds and American Bird Conservancy

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/2/11

Observation Time: 1:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Road near soccer field parking lot

Common Name: Beach Rose

Scientific Name: Rosa rugosa

More Information: University of Rhode Island

Beach Rose

 

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 9/4/20

Observation Time: 2:15 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm (TTOR)

Common Name: Bee fly

Scientific Name: Systropus macer

Comments: This fly looks like a wasp. It was feeding on a late purple aster blossom beside the dirt road under the power lines.

More Information: Forestry Images and Bugguide.net

Observer: Deborah Radovsky

Observation Date: 11/24/18

Observation Time: 8:30 a.m.

Observation Location: in a tree at the edge of Lake Massapoag, near Beach St.

Common Name: Belted Kingfisher

Scientific Name: Megaceryle alcyon

Comments: Kingfishers have also been sighted near the boat launch area and in the Gavins Pond area. They dive for small fish. They nest in burrows.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 8/3/10

Observation Time: 9:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond

Common Name: Belted Kingfisher

Scientific Name: Megaceryle alcyon

Comments: A pair of belted kingfishers were diving simultaneously several times into Gavins Pond. The bottom photo shows the splash of the kingfisher diving in.

Kingfishers nest in burrows on the banks of ponds and rivers.

More Information: University of Massachusetts

Belted Kingfisher

Belted Kingfisher

 

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 9/18/14

Observation Time: 2:50 p.m.

Observation Place: near Lake Massapoag boat launching ramp

Common Name: Belted Kingfisher

Scientific Name: Megaceryle alcyon

Comments: Belted kingfishers nest in a burrow, usually in a dirt bank near water. Their call is a distinctive, scolding chatter. Check out the recordings at the link below.

More Information:  All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 9/9/13

Observation Time: 2:05 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Dam

Common Name: Belted Kingfisher

Scientific Name: Megaceryle alcyon

Comments: These charismatic birds dive for fish. Believe it or not, they nest in burrows on the banks of streams and ponds.

More Information: University of Massachusetts

Belted Kingfisher

 

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 11/12/12

Observation Time: 5:30 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Dam

Common Name: Big Brown Bat

Scientific Name: Eptesicus fuscus

Comments: New England has little brown bats and big brown bats. Little brown bats are only found in New England in summer. Since these bats were observed in mid-November, they are presumably big brown bats. Bats fly fast, so getting these photos was not easy!

More Information: Mass Audubon

Big Brown Bat

Big Brown Bat

 

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/9/20

Observation Time: 2:00 p.m.

Observation Location: near soccer parking lot on Gavins Pond Road

Common Name: Bigtooth Aspen Tree

Scientific Name: Populus grandidentata

Comments: Bigtooth Aspen (Populusgrandidentata) is a native deciduous tree, which grows throughout northeastern North America. It is a member of the willow family. A fast-growing, but short-lived, pioneer species, Bigtooth Aspen attains heights of 60 to 80 feet.

More Information: WildAdirondacks.org

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/12/11

Observation Time: 8:15 a.m.

Observation Location: meadow near Gavins Pond dam

Common Name: Bird’s Foot Violet

Scientific Name: Viola pedata

Comments: The leaves of this pretty wildflower are reminiscent of bird’s feet. Not a common violet locally, only one site in Blue Hills. Likes dry sandy soils; has also been spotted in woods north of Knollwood Cemetery in Sharon.

More Information: US Wildflowers Database (USDA)

Bird's Foot Violet

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/19/20

Observation Time: 9:20 a.m.

Observation Location: near Gavins Pond

Common Name: Bird’s Foot Violet

Scientific Name: Viola pedata

Comments: Bird-foot violets are perennials with five-petaled flowers that bloom from March to June. The flowers are typically blue, but can range from white to purple. They spread by sending out rhizomes. The fan-shaped leaves have three lobes which are said to resemble a bird’s feet.

More Information: US Wildflowers Database (USDA)

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/27/19

Observation Time: 4:40 p.m.

Observation Location: Power lines near Walpole St.

Common Name: Bird’s Foot Violet

Scientific Name: Viola pedata

Comments: Bird-foot violets are perennials with five-petaled flowers that bloom from March to June. The flowers are typically blue, but can range from white to purple. They spread by sending out rhizomes. The fan-shaped leaves have three lobes which are said to resemble a bird’s feet.

More Information: US Wildflowers Database (USDA)

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/30/14

Observation Time: 12:05 p.m.

Observation Location: Power lines near Walpole St.

Common Name: Bird’s Foot Violet

Scientific Name: Viola pedata

Comments: Bird-foot violets are perennials with five-petaled flowers that bloom from March to June. The flowers are typically blue, but can range from white to purple. They spread by sending out rhizomes. The fan-shaped leaves have three lobes which are said to resemble bird feet.

More Information: US Wildflowers Database (USDA)

Bird's Foot Violet

Bird's Foot Violet

 

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/6/11

Observation Time: 1:40 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Road (bridge near soccer
fields)

Common Name: Bittersweet Nightshade

Scientific Name: Solanum dulcamara

More Information: King County, WA

Bittersweet Nightshade

Bittersweet Nightshade

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/11/19

Observation Time: 10:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Black-and-white Warbler

Scientific Name: Mniotilta varia

Comments: Black and white warblers make a high-pitched squeaking sound like a turning wheel that needs to be oiled. They are most often found scurrying up and down tree trunks and branches looking under the bark for insect larvae. The one in the photo has caught its breakfast.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/13/14

Observation Time: 7:35 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Black and White Warbler

Scientific Name: Mniotilta varia

Comments: Black and white warblers are usually seen moving up and down tree trunks looking for bugs under the bark.

More Information: All About Birds

Black and White Warbler

Black and White Warbler

 

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/3/18

Observation Time: 8:40 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Black and White Warbler

Scientific Name: Mniotilta varia

Comments: Black and white warblers are usually seen moving up and down tree trunks looking for bugs under the bark.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/16/13

Observation Time: 7:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Black and White Warbler (female)

Scientific Name: Mniotilta varia

Comments: Black and white warblers creep along tree trunks and branches foraging for insects. Their high-pitched squeaky song sounds like a wheel turning that needs to be oiled.

More Information: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Black-and-white_Warbler/overview

Black and White Warbler (female)

 

Observer: Regen Jamieson

Observation Date: 8/11/09

Observation Location: Moose Hill in the meadow at the end of the “unnatural trail”.

Common Name: Black and Yellow Garden Spider

Scientific Name: Argiope aurantia

Comments: Males range from 5 to 9 mm; females from 19 to 28 mm. Like other members of Argiope they are considered harmless to humans.The female of the species grows much larger than the male. Females have large rounded bodies that may grow to 40 mm (1 1/2 inches), excluding the legs. If the length of the legs is added, the female can reach 75 mm (3″) in diameter. Males are thin-bodied and only 20 mm (¾”) long. Garden Spiders often build webs in areas adjacent to open sunny fields where they stay concealed and protected from the wind. The spider can also be found along the eaves of houses and outbuildings or in any tall vegetation where they can securely stretch a web. The circular part of the female’s web may reach two feet in diameter. Webs are built at elevations from two to eight feet off the ground. Female Argiope aurantia spiders tend to be somewhat local, often staying in one place throughout much of their lifetime. After mating, the male dies, and is sometimes then eaten by the female. She lays her eggs at night on a sheet of silky material, then covers them with another layer of silk, then a protective brownish silk. She then uses her legs to form the sheet into a ball with an upturned neck. Egg sacs range from 5/8″ to 1″ in diameter. She often suspends the egg sac right on her web, near the center where she spends most of her time. Each spider produces from one to four sacs with perhaps over a thousand eggs inside each. She guards the eggs against predation as long as she is able. However, as the weather cools, she becomes more frail, and dies around the time of the first hard frost. (from Wikipedia)

More Information: Animal Diversity Web

Black and Yellow Garden Spider

Black and Yellow Garden Spider