Sightings – Animals

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/2/11

Observation Time: 2:50 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond

Common Name: Slaty Skimmer dragonfly

Scientific Name: Libellula incesta

Comments: The first photo is a female. The second is a male.

Watch this video of the slaty skimmer dragonfly as it oviposits at Gavins Pond.

More Photos: Odonata.bogfoot.net

Slaty Skimmer Dragonfly

Slaty Skimmer Dragonfly

Observer: Josh Simons

Observation Date: 6/14/20

Observation Time: 11:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill area

Common Name: Slaty Skimmer dragonfly (female)

Scientific Name: Libellula incesta

Comments: Watch this video of the slaty skimmer dragonfly as it oviposits at Gavins Pond.

More Photos: Odonata.bogfoot.net

Observer: Vin Zollo

Observation Date: 6/15/13

Observation Time: 11:02 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Slender Spreadwing damselfly

Scientific Name: Lestes rectangularis

Comments: Billings Farm Loop Boardwalk

More Information: BugGuide

Slender Spreadwing Damselfly

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/25/11

Observation Time: 3:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond near soccer fields

Common Name: Small Cabbage White butterfly

Scientific Name: Pieris rapae

Comments: The top photo shows a copulating pair. The male has a single black wing spot. The female has two black wing spots, and slightly yellower wings.

More Information: Wikipedia

Small Cabbage White Butterfly

Small Cabbage White Butterfly

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 9/7/13

Observation Time: 3:20 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Dam

Common Name: Smeared Dagger Moth caterpillar

Scientific Name: Acronicta oblinita

Comments: For pictures of the adult moth, see: http://www.discoverlife.org/mp/20q?search=Acronicta+oblinita&guide=Moth&cl=US/GA/Clarke

More Information: Butterflies and Moths of North America

Smeared Dagger Moth Caterpillar

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/3/20

Observation Time: 8:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Near Billings Brook downstream of Gavins Pond dam

Common Name: Snapping Turtle

Scientific Name: Chelydra serpentina

Comments: Reptiles are cold-blooded. This individual had hauled itself out of the chilly water to warm itself in the sun. In early June, snapping turtles come out of the water, dig a hole in sandy areas, and bury their eggs. The eggs hatch in late summer or early fall.

Temperature during incubation influences the sex of the hatchlings. See: https://www.jstor.org/stable/1563778?seq=1

More Information: Tufts Wildlife Clinic and Mass Audubon’s guide to turtle species

The snapping turtle’s tail looks like something you might find in Jurassic Park.

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/22/16

Observation Time: 6:15 p.m.

Observation Location: Outflow pool below Gavins Pond dam

Common Name: Snapping Turtle

Scientific Name: Chelydra serpentina

Comments: Snapping turtles come out of the water and lay their eggs in sandy areas in early June. The eggs hatch in late summer or early fall.

More Information: Tufts Wildlife Clinic and Mass Audubon’s guide to turtle species

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 8/21/10

Observation Time: 7:50 a.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Road

Common Name: Snapping Turtle

Scientific Name: Chelydra serpentina

Comments: It is a common misconception that snapping turtles may be safely picked up by the tail with no harm to the animal; in fact, this has a high chance of injuring the turtle, especially the tail itself and the vertebral column. Lifting the turtle with the hands is difficult and dangerous. Snappers can stretch their necks back across their own carapace and to their hind feet on either side to bite. Also, their claws are sharp and capable of inflicting significant lacerations.

Manual lifting is best accomplished by grabbing the base of the tail right near the shell, lifting a tiny bit and sliding a flat hand with the fingers tightly together between its back legs and under its stomach. The snapper is then lifted off the ground much like a pizza, keeping its head pointed away from anyone. They cannot bite under their stomachs. If available wearing thick work gloves is advised when handling adult snappers. Washing hands or using hand sanitizer is advised after handling any turtle (wild or pet) as they can carry Salmonella bacteria.

More Information: Wikipedia

Snapping Turtle

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 8/25/10

Observation Time: 7:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Spillway at Gavins Pond dam

Common Name: Snapping Turtle

Scientific Name: Chelydra serpentina

Snapping Turtle Drama

On August 25 the spillway at the Gavins Pond dam was flowing strongly following four inches of rain in three days.

Snapping Turtle Drama

A good-sized snapping turtle had gotten swept by the current into the spillway at the Gavins Pond dam. It was hanging on to the concrete lip at the entrance of the spillway by its front claws. If it let go, it would have been swept over the falls and onto the shallow rocks, which might have been fatal. A few years ago, I saw a broken carapace of a big snapping turtle in the outflow pool. I suppose it had gotten swept over the falls and broke its shell.

Snapping Turtle Drama

Moments after I took the above picture, the turtle’s right front claw lost its grip, and the turtle lurched a couple inches backward toward the falls. I thought it was a goner, but it continued to hang on by its left front claw. It somehow managed to pull its right claw forward against the strong current and regained its grip on the lip of the spillway. Very slowly and carefully, it maneuvered itself toward the pond.

Snapping Turtle Drama

Once out of the current, it rested briefly, and I was able to get this last photo before it swam off.

More Information: Wikipedia

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/27/19

Observation Time: 1:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Conservation land near Morse & Lakeview

Common Name: Snipe Fly

Scientific Name: Rhagio mystaceus

Comments: Also known as a down-looker fly. Two of the photos show why.

More Information: Wikipedia

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 12/26/08

Observation Time: 1:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Dirt road by soccer field near Gavins Pond

Common Name: Snow Bunting

Scientific Name: Plectrophenax nivalis

Comments: Flock of around a dozen birds was gleaning seeds on the dirt road.

More Information: Cornell Lab of Ornithology “All About Birds”

Observer: Kathy  Farrell

Observation Date: January 11, 2017

Observation Time: N/A

Observation Location: my back yard

Common Name: Snow Flea

Scientific Name: Hypogastrura harveyi or Hypogastrura nivicol

Comments: At close examination, perhaps in melting snow around the base of a tree, tiny black flecks might be found sprinkled in the snow. They probably look like bits of dirt at first glance, but they are actually tiny soil animals known as snow fleas. Officially, they are called springtails and are not actually fleas.

On any given summer day, hundreds of thousands of springtails can populate one cubic meter of top soil; at 1-2 mm, they largely go unnoticed by people. In the winter, however, two species of dark blue springtails— Hypogastrura harveyi and Hypogastrura nivicol—can be easily spotted against the white backdrop of snow. These hexapods may have acquired the nickname of snow fleas due to their ability to jump great distances, a feat fleas boast as well. Whereas fleas use enlarged hind legs, springtails have a tail-like appendage called a furcula that unfolds to launch the hexapods great distances.
But unlike fleas, springtails are not parasites; they feed on decaying organic matter in the soil (such as leaf litter) and, therefore, play an important part in natural decomposition. Snow fleas in particular are able to withstand the bitter temperatures of winter thanks to a “glycine-rich antifreeze protein,” as reported in a study published in Biophysical Journal.

More Information: http://www.esa.org/esablog/research/snow-fleas-helpful-winter-critters-2/

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 12/12/08

Observation Time: 10:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Ward’s field near Heights Elementary School

Common Name: Snow Goose

Scientific Name: Chen caerulescens

Comments: There was a flock of about 10 snow geese in Ward’s field. They were all white except for black wing tips.

More Information: Cornell Lab of Ornithology “All About Birds”

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/29/15

Observation Time: 3:20 p.m.

Observation Location: 4 Gavins Pond Road

Common Name: Snowberry Clearwing Moth

Scientific Name: Hemaris diffinis

Comments: Feeding on butterfly bush.

More information: Butterflies and Moths of North America

Snowberry clearwing moth-3

Snowberry clearwing moth-2


 

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/9/13

Observation Time: 4:35 p.m.

Observation Location: soccer parking area near Gavins Pond

Common Name: Snowberry Clearwing Moth

Scientific Name: Hemaris diffinis

Comments: This diurnal moth is about the size of a bumblebee.

More information: Butterflies and Moths of North America

Snowberry Clearwing Moth

Snowberry Clearwing Moth

Snowberry Clearwing Moth

Observer: Josh Simons

Observation Date: 2/10/14

Observation Time: 5:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill area

Common Name: Song Sparrow

Scientific Name: Melospiza melodia

Comments: Melos meaning “song”, “spiza” meaning “a finch” and “melodia” meaning “a pleasant sound”. “Sparrow” comes from the Anglo-Saxon “spearwa” or “sparrow”, literally “flutterer”. [The Dictionary of American Bird Names by Ernest A. Choate]

More Information: Cornell Lab of Ornithology “All About Birds”

Song Sparrow

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 4/7/11

Observation Time: 5:40 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Road near soccer fields

Common Name: Song Sparrow

Scientific Name: Melospiza melodia

Comments: This song sparrow was gleaning seeds. Their distinctive, melodious song is a good one to memorize because it is so common.

More Information: Cornell Lab of Ornithology “All About Birds”

Song Sparrow

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/29/16

Observation Time: 1:50 p.m.

Observation Location: near Lake Massapoag boat ramp

Common Name: Song Sparrow

Scientific Name: Melospiza melodia

Comments: There are at least 18 species of sparrows in Massachusetts. Learning their respective calls is a good way to find and identify them. The spot on its chest also helps with identification.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/29/14

Observation Time: 11:25 a.m.

Observation Location: Borderland State Park

Common Name: Song Sparrow

Scientific Name: Melospiza melodia

Comments: There are at least 18 species of sparrows in Massachusetts. Learning their respective calls is a good way to find and identify them.

More Information: All About Birds

Song Sparrow

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/31/20

Observation Time: 4:50 p.m.

Observation Location: Trustees of Reservations’ Moose Hill Farm

Common Name: Song Sparrow

Scientific Name: Melospiza melodia

Comments: There are at least 18 species of sparrows in Massachusetts. Learning their respective calls is a good way to find and identify them.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/2/19

Observation Time: 3:45 p.m.

Observation Location: in the wetlands beneath the power lines across the street from Ward’s Berry Farm

Common Name: Song Sparrow

Scientific Name: Melospiza melodia

Comments: There are at least 18 species of sparrows in Massachusetts. Learning their respective calls is a good way to find and identify them.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/19/12

Observation Time: 5:40 p.m.

Observation Location: dirt road leading to Gavins Pond Dam

Common Name: Spangled skimmer dragonfly (female)

Scientific Name: Libellula cyanea

Comments: This photo is a female. Male spangled skimmers are slate blue. Hence the species name “cyanea” which refers to its cyan (blue) coloration.

Identifying dragonflies and damselflies is fun. Get a copy of A Field Guide to the Dragonflies and Damselflies of Massachusetts by Blair Nikula, Jennifer L. Loose, and Matthew R. Burne.

More Information: Dragonflies and Damselflies of NJ

Spangled Skimmer Dragonfly

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/17/13

Observation Time: 4:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Dam

Common Name: Spangled Skimmer dragonfly (male)

Scientific Name: Libellula cyanea

Comments: Males of this species are blue, while females are brown. Both have striking white and black stigmas on their wings. No other dragonfly in the Northeast has white stigmas on its wings. Males are territorial.

More Information: Dragonflies and Damselflies of NJ

Spangled Skimmer Dragonfly (Male)

Observer: Sherry Berlingo

Observation Dates:

Spicebush Swallowtail Caterpillar – Found on playground in Sharon 09/20/16
Spicebush Swallowtail Chrysalis – Formed chrysalis on 09/22/16
Overwintered in outdoor shed
Spicebush Swallowtail Butterfly – Emerged on 06/01/17, released on 06/02/17

Observation Location: The Childrens Center, Sharon Public School

Common Name: Spicebush Swallowtail butterfly

Scientific Name: Papilio troilus

Comments: This large black butterfly is more common in Sharon than the similar black swallowtail. Learn how to tell them apart at: http://www.naba.org/chapters/nabambc/frames-2species.asp?sp1=Papilio-polyxenes&sp2=Papilio-troilus

More Information: Wikipedia

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/3/15

Observation Time: 3:20 p.m.

Observation Location: Town-owned land at Morse and Lakeview Sts.

Common Name: Spicebush Swallowtail butterfly

Scientific Name: Papilio troilus

Comments: This spicebush swallowtail butterfly was observed feeding on milkweed flowers. Note that spicebush swallowtail butterflies are quite similar to black swallowtail butterflies. Spicebush swallowtails have a marking that looks like a comet among the row of large orange spots on each of its rear wings (see photos). The black swallowtail just has another orange spot where the spicebush has the comet marking.

More Information: Massachusetts Butterfly Club

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/6/14

Observation Time: 1:45 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond area near soccer parking area

Common Name: Spicebush Swallowtail butterfly

Scientific Name: Papilio troilus

Comments: This spicebush swallowtail butterfly was observed feeding on milkweed flowers. Note that spicebush swallowtail butterflies are very similar to black swallowtail butterflies. Learn how to tell the difference at: http://www.naba.org/chapters/nabambc/frames-2species.asp?sp1=Papilio-polyxenes&sp2=Papilio-troilus

Black Swallowtail butterfly

 

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/4/13

Observation Time: 8:45 a.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Dam

Common Name: Spined Soldier Bug (nymph)

Scientific Name: Podisus maculiventris

Comments: Spined soldier bugs are small predatory stink bugs. They molt several times before reaching maturity. Each phase is referred to as an instar. This one was in the third “instar”.

More Information: University of Florida

Spined Soldier Bug (Nymph)

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/9/20

Observation Time: 1:50 p.m.

Observation Location: beside soccer parking area on Gavins Pond Rd

Common Name: Spittlebug

Scientific Name: Philaenus spumarius

Comments: Spittlebugs are known for the frothy spittle mass they produce while feeding on plants.

More Information: University of Minnesota Extension

Observer: Deb Radovsky

Observation Date: 5/12/18

Observation Time: 7:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Lake Massapoag

Common Name: Spotted Sandpiper

Scientific Name: Actitis macularius

Comments: The Spotted Sandpiper is the most widespread breeding sandpiper in North America. Female Spotted Sandpipers sometimes practice an unusual breeding strategy called polyandry, where a female mates with up to four males, each of which then cares for a clutch of eggs.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/31/10

Observation Time: 11:15 a.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond outflow pool

Common Name: Spotted Sandpiper

Scientific Name: Actitis macularia

Comments: Though you may think of the beach as the best place to see a sandpiper, look for Spotted Sandpipers alone or in pairs along the shores of lakes, rivers, and streams.

More Information: All About Birds

Spotted Sandpiper

Spotted Sandpiper

Observer: Deborah Radovsky

Observation Date: 8/6/20

Observation Time: 7:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Lake Massapoag

Common Name: Spotted Sandpiper

Scientific Name: Actitis macularius

Comments: The Spotted Sandpiper is the most widespread breeding sandpiper in North America. Female Spotted Sandpipers sometimes practice an unusual breeding strategy called polyandry, where a female mates with up to four males, each of which then cares for a clutch of eggs.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/28/10

Observation Time: 8:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Road behind Shaw’s Plaza

Common Name: Spotted Turtle (female)

Scientific Name: Clemmys guttata

Comments: This female spotted turtle may have been searching for a sandy spot to lay eggs. It may take up to 7 years for a spotted turtle to reach sexual maturity. Or perhaps it was returning to deeper water after the vernal pool dried up where it was feeding on amphibian eggs. Young spotted turtles only have one yellow spot per scute. More yellow spots appear as they age.

Many turtles get run over by cars. If you find a turtle on a road, dead or alive, please report it to the Massachusetts Turtle Atlas

More Information: Mass. Natural Heritage and Endangered Species Program (NHESP) “Massachusetts Forestry Conservation Management Practices for Spotted Turtles”

Spotted Turtle

Spotted Turtle

Observer: Zahava Friedman

Observation Date: 7/17/18

Observation Time: 

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Road

Common Name: Spotted Turtle

Scientific Name: Clemmys guttata

Comments: Rare in Massachusetts. Spotted turtles visit vernal pools in spring to feed on amphibian eggs. When the pools dry up in summer, they must trek overland to return to a permanent pond. Unfortunately, this often entails crossing roads.

More Information: Natural History and Endangered Species Program of Massachusetts

Observer: Kurt Buermann

Observation Date: 7/28/17

Observation Location: King Philips Trail, Sharon

Common Name: Spotted Turtle

Scientific Name: Clemmys guttata

Comments: Rare in Massachusetts. Spotted turtles visit vernal pools in spring to feed on amphibian eggs. When the pools dry up in summer, they must trek overland to return to a permanent pond. Unfortunately, this often entails crossing roads.

More Information: Natural History and Endangered Species Program of Massachusetts

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 4/29/12

Observation Time: 1:30 p.m.

Observation Location: Field near Gavins Pond Dam

Common Name: Spring Azure butterfly

Scientific Name: Genus Celastrina

Comments: This is either Celastrina ladon or Celastrina lucia. Spring azures are small butterflies that emerge in early spring. The wings are blue on top and pale white with black spots on the bottom. This specimen is worn, faded and probably nearing the end.

More Information: New Jersey Butterflies

Spring Azure Butterfly

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/11/19

Observation Time: 11:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Spring Azure butterfly

Scientific Name: Celastrina spp.

Comments: Spring azures are small butterflies that emerge in early spring. The wings are blue on top and white with dark specks on the underside. It’s hard to get a photo of the beautiful blue on the upper side of their wings because they typically close their wings, as shown in this photo, when they are not flying.

More Information: New Jersey Butterflies

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/19/13

Observation Time: 2:40 p.m.

Observation Location: Field near Gavins Pond Dam

Common Name: Spring Azure butterfly

Scientific Name: Celastrina spp.

Comments: Spring azures are small butterflies that emerge in early spring. The wings are blue on top and pale white with black spots on the bottom.

More Information: New Jersey Butterflies

 

Observer: Kurt Buermann

Observation Date: 11/29/20

Observation Time: 10:00 a.m.

Observation Location: 45 Furnace St.

Common Name: Globular Springtails

Scientific Name: Sminthuridae

Comments: I have often seen these brown dots floating in water, ponds or birdbaths. Today I got really curious. With the naked eye they seem like some sort of pollen. If you scoop a few onto your finger tip they jump off so they are very much alive. Each is separate but they really seem to get together in clumps. They are about 1 to 1.5 millimeters in size.

More information: Wikipedia

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/7/15

Observation Time: 7:45 p.m.

Observation Location: Town-owned land at Morse and Lakeview Streets

Common Name: Striped Hairstreak butterfly

Scientific Name: Satyrium liparops

Comments: This small butterfly was feeding on milkweed blossoms. Striped hairstreaks are often present in small numbers when milkweeds and dogbanes are in bloom.

Striped hairstreaks closely resemble banded hairstreaks. The blue marginal spot on the hind wing is capped with orange in the striped hairstreak but not in the banded hairstreak.

More Information: Massachusetts Butterfly Club

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/27/15

Observation Time: 10:25 a.m.

Observation Location: Town land near Morse and Lakeview Streets

Common Name: Summer Azure butterfly

Scientific Name: Celastrina neglecta

Comments: Summer azures are small, pale blue butterflies that emerge in June.

More Information: Wikipedia

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/19/13

Observation Time: 10:00 p.m.

Observation Location: 4 Gavins Pond Road

Common Name: Summer Fishfly

Scientific Name: Chauliodes pectinicornis

Comments: This large (1.5″) flying insect got into our house. When it landed on my pants, I walked outside and took this photo. It has an interesting life cycle.

More Information: University of Wisconsin BioWeb

Summer Fishfly

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/27/19

Observation Time: 9:35 a.m.

Observation Location: Conservation land near Morse & Lakeview

Common Name: Swainson’s Thrush

Scientific Name: Catharus ustulatus

Comments: I lucked into this one. As I was walking down a trail through the woods I saw it fly from the trail up to a nearby branch, and I got just one photo before it flew away. I assumed it was a hermit thrush, but a friend studied the photo and told me it’s a Swainson’s. I had never seen one before.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/25/19

Observation Time: 8:15 a.m.

Observation Location: 4 Gavins Pond Road (kitchen window)

Common Name: Tan Jumping Spider

Scientific Name: Platycryptus undatus

Comments: A member of Salticidae, this spider jumps to ambush its prey in lieu of creating webs to ensnare it. It is a fast runner and it pounces on top of the insect it plans to eat. As the Tan Jumping Spider leaps toward an insect, a strand of spider silk is shot at the target to keep it in tow should it escape. This strand is called a dragline. The spider also uses its spider silk to make a shelter out of dead leaves and other debris when it is not actively hunting. It is believed to overwinter and hibernate in large groups together until spring.

The hairy, brown Tan Jumping Spider is known to be friendly when handled gently by humans, and it has a reputation for being curious about people. It is not inclined to bite, but may do so if handled roughly. It has keen vision as far as spider sight is understood. Tan Jumping Spiders often stare at people and approach them for a closer look if they feel safe enough to do so.

More Information: Insect Identification

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/17/15

Observation Time: 7:45 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Tennessee Warbler

Scientific Name: Setophaga magnolia

Comments: This bird was flitting around in a flowering crabapple tree.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/4/11

Observation Time: 3:50 p.m.

Observation Location: conservation land near Billings Street

Common Name: Tent Caterpillar

Scientific Name: Malacosoma americanum

Comments: The moths oviposit almost exclusively on trees in the plant family Rosaceae, particularly cherry (Prunus) and apple (Malus). The adult moth lays her eggs in a single batch in late spring or early summer. An egg mass contains about 200 to 300 eggs. Tent caterpillars are among the most social of larvae. The newly hatched caterpillars initiate the construction of a silk tent soon after emerging. They typically aggregate at the tent site throughout their larval stage, expanding the tent each day to accommodate their increasing size. The caterpillars feed three times each day, just before dawn, at midafternoon, and in the evening after sunset. During each bout of feeding, the caterpillars emerge from the tent, add silk to the structure, move to distant feeding sites en masse, feed, and then return immediately to the tent where they rest until the next activity period.

More Information: Wikipedia

Tent Caterpillar

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/7/14

Observation Time: 12:40 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Dam

Common Name: Tetragnatha Spider

Scientific Name: Tetragnatha sp.

Comments: Typically found near ponds and wetlands.

More Information: Wikipedia

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 4/7/14

Observation Time: 11:55 a.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond area (field near dam)

Common Name:“The Infant” moth

Scientific Name: Archiearis infans

Comments: “Infans” is a Latin word meaning “an infant”; refers to the adult’s early emergence from a pupa in the spring, and is the basis for the common names “The Infant” and “First-born Geometer.”

More Information: BugGuide

The Infant Moth

The Infant Moth

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/7/18

Observation Time: 1:45 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm (TTOR)

Common Name: Thick-headed Fly

Scientific Name: Physocephala tibialis

Comments: This family of flies is a parasite of solitary bees, and sometimes wasps.  The female grabs the host while in flight and forces an egg between the bee’s abdominal segments.

More Information: NatureSearch

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/16/11

Observation Time: 4:45 p.m.

Observation Location: near Gavins Pond

Common Name: Thread-waisted wasp

Scientific Name: Ammophila procera

Comments: This large solitary wasp (over an inch long) has an interesting life cycle, which is shown in this Vimeo video.

More Information: insectidentification.org

Thread-Waisted Wasp

Thread-Waisted Wasp

Observer: Lonnie Friedman

Observation Date: 5/31/20

Observation Time: 1:50 p.m.

Observation Location: In our yard (Gavins Pond Road)

Common Name: Tiger Swallowtail butterfly

Scientific Name: Papilio glaucus

Comments: This striking, large butterfly is fairly common.

More Information: Butterflies and Moths of North America

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/26/14

Observation Time: 6:10 p.m.

Observation Location: field near Gavins Pond dam

Common Name: Tiger Swallowtail butterfly

Scientific Name: Papilio glaucus

Comments: Tiger swallowtails are spectacular and relatively common.

More Information: Wikipedia

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail Butterfly

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/30/10

Observation Time: 3:50 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Tiger Swallowtail butterfly

Scientific Name: Papilio glaucus

Comments: Females are dimorphic. The yellow morph differs from the male in having a blue postmedian area on the dorsal hindwing. In the dark morph, the areas that are normally yellow are replaced with dark gray or black.

More Information: Wikipedia

Tiger Swallowtail

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/17/13

Observation Time: 1:30 p.m.

Observation Location: 4 Gavins Pond Road (back yard)

Common Name: Tiger Swallowtail butterfly

Scientific Name: Papilio glaucus

Comments: As I was picking raspberries in the garden, I saw this gorgeous butterfly, so I ran inside and grabbed my camera.

More Information: Wikipedia

Tiger Swallowtail Butterfly

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/25/14

Observation Time: 3:20 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Dam

Common Name: Tiger Swallowtail butterfly

Scientific Name: Papilio glaucus

Comments: This butterfly posed nicely on a thistle blossom.

More Information: Wikipedia

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/26/11

Observation Time: 1:30 p.m.

Observation Location: dirt road leading to the Gavins Pond dam

Common Name:Tiger Swallowtail butterfly

Scientific Name: Papilio glaucus

Comments: This butterfly was so preoccupied with feeding on some decomposing organic matter that I was able to approach within a few inches to take this photo.

More Information: Butterflies and Moths of North America

Tiger Swallowtail Butterfly

Observer: Kurt Buermann

Observation Date: 7/28/17

Observation Time: N/A

Observation Location: In our yard (Furnace Street) on a spicebush shrub

Common Name: Tiger Swallowtail butterfly

Scientific Name: Papilio glaucus

Comments: fairly common large butterfly

More Information: Butterflies and Moths of North America

Observer: Kurt Buermann

Observation Date: 7/31/16

Observation Time: N/A

Observation Location: Furnace Street

Common Name: Tiger Swallowtail butterfly

Scientific Name: Papilio glaucus

Comments: A common butterfly whose range stretches along the entire U.S. Atlantic coast and as far west as Texas. Having the ability to utilize a number of host plants and habitats this species does well and is not threatened.

More Information: Wikipedia
eastern tiger swallowtail 7-31-2016

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 8/13/20

Observation Time: 1:52 p.m.

Observation Location: Mountain St.

Common Name: Tree Cricket

Scientific Name: Oecanthus spp.

Comments: The tree cricket is also known as poor man’s thermometer, because if you count the number of chirps in 15 seconds and add 37 you get the temperature close to the Fahrenheit temperature outdoors.

More Information: Wikipedia

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 9/26/12

Observation Time: 1:35 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Road (bridge near soccer fields)

Common Name: Tree Cricket

Scientific Name: Oecanthus spp.

Comments: The tree cricket is also known as poor man’s thermometer. It is because if you count the number of chirps in 15 seconds and add 37 you get the temperature close to the Fahrenheit temperature outdoors.

More Information: Wikipedia

Tree Cricket

Observer: Kurt Buermann

Observation Date: 5/12/11

Observation Time: 1:30 p.m.

Observation Location: Laveview Street meadow

Common Name: Tree swallow

Scientific Name: Tachycineta bicolor

Comments: Very commonly nests near bluebirds. Tree swallows may defend bluebirds against other tree swallow if they occupy adjacent nesting boxes.

More Information: All About Birds.org

Tree Swallow

Observer: Deb Radovsky

Observation Date: 5/18/16

Observation Time: N/A

Observation Location: Moose Hill area

Common Name: Tree Swallow

Scientific Name: Tachycineta bicolor

Comments: Tree swallows compete with bluebirds for nesting boxes.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/30/10

Observation Time: 4:35 p.m.

Observation Location: field near Gavins Pond

Common Name: Tree swallow

Scientific Name: Tachycineta bicolor

Comments: Tree swallows nest in bluebird nesting boxes. One strategy is to locate two bluebird houses within 10 yards of each other. Tree swallows nesting in one box will drive other tree swallows away from the other box, but allow bluebirds to move in.

More Information: All About Birds.org

Tree Swallow

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/4/11

Observation Time: 1:00 p.m.

Observation Location: near Gavins Pond Dam

Common Name: Tree swallow

Scientific Name: Tachycineta bicolor

Comments: Tree swallows compete for bluebird nesting boxes. Bluebird house are often set out in pairs. One box gets taken by a pair of tree swallows. They drive other tree swallows away from the other box, but allow bluebirds to move in.

More Information: All About Birds.org

Tree Swallow

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/8/14

Observation Time: 7:10 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Tree swallow

Scientific Name: Tachycineta bicolor

Comments: Tree swallows compete with bluebirds for nesting boxes. However, if nesting boxes are sited in pairs, a tree swallow will occupy one box and drive away other tree swallows from the other box. That will allow bluebirds to nest there.

More Information: All About Birds.org

Tree Swallow

Tree Swallow

Observer: Josh Simons

Observation Date: 1/1/09

Observation Time: 2:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Parkway

Common Name: Tufted Titmouse

Scientific Name: Baeolophus bicolor

Comments: This and the junco and wren photos were all taken with a Canon 50D and a Canon 500mm f4 lens from the comfort of my kitchen on Moose Hill Parkway. We have feeders that attract lots of birds who land on a nearby lilac bush while waiting for their turn at the feeders.

In terms of processing, I use very little. The images are cropped and very small
adjustments are made to exposure and contrast with sometimes a little extra
sharpening applied.

That and the nice, slanting winter sunlight are all there is to it.

More Information: Cornell Lab of Ornithology “All About Birds”

Tufted Titmouse

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 11/27/20

Observation Time: 12:20 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Rd. (my back yard)

Common Name: Tufted Titmouse

Scientific Name: Baeolophus bicolor

Comments: Tufted titmice are abundant in Sharon. They are often encountered in the company of chickadees.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 2/25/20

Observation Time: 12:50 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audbon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Tufted Titmouse

Scientific Name: Baeolophus bicolor

Comments: This tufted titmouse was feeding at the bird feeder by the Moose Hill Audubon headquarters.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 4/15/20

Observation Time: 1:15 p.m.

Observation Location: Conservation land near Sandy Ridge Circle

Common Name: Tufted Titmouse

Scientific Name: Baeolophus bicolor

Comments: Tufted titmice are abundant in the woods in Sharon. They are often encountered in the company of chickadees.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/1/18

Observation Time: 9:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audbon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Tufted Titmouse

Scientific Name: Baeolophus bicolor

Comments: Often seen in the company of chickadees.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/2/20

Observation Time: 12:50 p.m.

Observation Location: 4 Gavins Pond Road (in my back yard)

Common Name: Tufted Titmouse

Scientific Name: Baeolophus bicolor

Comments: Tufted titmice are abundant in the woods in Sharon. They are often encountered in the company of chickadees.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 4/11/11

Observation Time: 6:10 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond

Common Name: Turkey Vulture

Scientific Name: Cathartes aura

Comments: Turkey vultures are gliders. They ride thermal updrafts, so they rarely need to flap their wings.

More Information: All About Birds

Turkey Vulture

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 4/20/20

Observation Time: 9:10 a.m.

Observation Location: conservation land near Lakeview & Morse

Common Name: Turkey Vulture

Scientific Name: Cathartes aura

Comments: Turkey vultures are gliders. They ride thermal updrafts, so they rarely need to flap their wings.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Rick Dumont

Observation Date: 7/28/09

Observation Time: 2:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Belcher Street

Common Name: Turkey Vulture

Scientific Name: Cathartes aura

Comments: A bad smell invaded my yard during a rainy, humid spell. The buzzard must have been attracted to it. The smell went away shortly after the buzzard did.

More Information: All About Birds

Turkey Vulture

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/19/13

Observation Time: 2:40 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Dam

Common Name: Turquoise Bluet damselfly

Scientific Name: Enallagma divagans

More Photos: The Hibbits Network

Turquoise Bluet