Sightings – Birds

Observer: Jason Platt

Observation Date: 5/8/18

Observation Time: 8:45 a.m.

Observation Location: under power lines at Moose Hill

Common Name: Blue-winged Warbler

Scientific Name: Vermivora cyanoptera

Comments: The blue-winged warbler’s song sounds like, “bee-buzz.”

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/21/20

Observation Time: 9:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm (formerly the Kendall Estate)

Common Name: Bobolink

Scientific Name: Dolichonyx oryzivorus

Comments: The big pasture at the Trustees of Reservations’ Moose Hill Farm is ideal breeding habitat for bobolinks. Meadow habitat is not nearly as prevalent in Massachusetts since industry replaced agriculture, and forests grew back in former pasture lands.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/26/19

Observation Time: 2:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm (formerly the Kendall Estate)

Common Name: Bobolink

Scientific Name: Dolichonyx oryzivorus

Comments: The big pasture at Moose Hill Farm is ideal breeding habitat for bobolinks. Meadow habitat is not nearly as prevalent in Massachusetts since industry replaced agriculture, and forests grew back in former farmlands.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Deb  Radovsky

Observation Date: 4/23/18

Observation Time: 6:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary (Billings Loop)

Common Name: Brown Creeper

Scientific Name: Certhia americana

Comments: Brown Creepers are tiny woodland birds with an affinity for the biggest trees they can find. Look for these little, long-tailed scraps of brown and white spiraling up stout trunks and main branches, sometimes passing downward-facing nuthatches along the way. They probe into crevices and pick at loose bark with their slender, downcurved bills, and build their hammock-shaped nests behind peeling flakes of bark. Their piercing calls can make it much easier to find this hard-to-see but common species.

More Information: All About Birds

 

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/2/11

Observation Time: 4:20 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Road near soccer field parking lot

Common Name: Brown Thrasher

Scientific Name: Toxostoma rufum

Comments: Brown thrashers are one of the three mimics. The other two are catbirds and mockingbirds. Brown thrashers repeat each vocalization twice. Mockingbirds repeat three or four times. Catbirds only make each vocalization once.

More Information: All About Birds.org

Brown Thrasher

 

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 4/7/14

Observation Time: 12:10 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond area near soccer fields

Common Name: Brown-headed Cowbird

Scientific Name: Molothrus ater

Comments: These Brown-headed Cowbirds were mating. Cowbirds parasitize other bird species. Female Cowbirds forgo building nests and instead lay their eggs in the nests of other birds, abandoning their young to foster parents, usually at the expense of at least some of the host’s own chicks. Once confined to the open grasslands of middle North America, cowbirds have surged in numbers and range as humans built towns and cleared woods.

More Information: All About Birds.org

Brown-headed Cowbird

Brown-headed Cowbird

 

Observer: Josh Simons

Observation Date: 5/10/20

Observation Time: 1:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill area

Common Name: Brown-headed Cowbird

Scientific Name: Molothrus ater

Comments: Cowbirds parasitize other bird species. Female Cowbirds forgo building nests and instead lay their eggs in the nests of other birds, abandoning their young to foster parents, usually at the expense of at least some of the host’s own chicks. Once confined to the open grasslands of middle North America, cowbirds have surged in numbers and range as humans built towns and cleared woods.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 11/19/13

Observation Time: 2:35 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond

Common Name: Bufflehead

Scientific Name: Bucephala albeola

Comments: Buffleheads are small, diving ducks. They nest in old woodpecker holes, particularly those made by Northern Flickers, in the forests of northern North America.

More Information: All About Birds

Bufflehead

 

Observer: Ilan Fisher

Observation Date: 3/8/20

Observation Time: 3:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Lake Massapoag (near Harding St. & Beach St.)

Common Name: Bufflehead

Scientific Name: Bucephala albeola

Comments: Shot a bit of video to go with previous days’ sightings at same location. See: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OdOIPxBSs1g

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/4/11

Observation Time: 12:45 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond

Common Name: Canada Goose

Scientific Name: Branta canadensis

Comments: Canada geese are quite common in Sharon, and can even become a nuisance, but these goslings sure are cute. If you are in the mood for a heartwarming movie, see “Fly Away Home” about a girl who adopts some orphaned goslings.

More Information: Mass Wildlife

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/21/18

Observation Time: 7:50 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Canada Warbler

Scientific Name: Cardellina canadensis

Comments: Canada Warblers migrate through Sharon in mid-May. They have a distinctive black collar and a white eye-ring.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 3/12/09

Observation Time: 7:45 a.m.

Observation Location: Soccer field by Gavins Pond Road

Common Name: Canada x Greylag hybrid goose

Scientific Name:

Comments: This morning I saw a strange goose among the Canada geese at the Gavins Pond soccer field nearest to Gavins Pond Road. It had a distinct white line all the way around the base of its dark beak, light gray cheeks with a dark head and neck, and dull orange legs (the Canada geese had black legs). The transition from the gray cheeks to the dark head was not as sharp as that of the Canada geese, and the gray cheek patch was quite a bit larger than the white “chin strap” of the Canada geese. The body and rump were very similar to the Canada geese. It looked like the some of the Canada x Greylag hybrids shown here except that it had a dark beak, and the white line around the base of the beak was more distinct.

I watched it fly in alone and land on the field among the Canada geese, which is why I noticed it in the first place.

This goose looked exactly like one photographed by Will Sweet earlier this winter. See:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/22560927@N04/3320242349/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/22560927@N04/3320241847/

More Information: Flickr: Hybrid Birds

Observer: Deb  Radovsky

Observation Date: 2/27/18

Observation Time: afternoon

Observation Location: Lake Massapoag

Common Name: Canvasback duck

Scientific Name: Aythya valisineria

Comments: The species name of the Canvasback, Aythya valisineria, comes from Vallisneria americana, or wild celery, whose winter buds and rhizomes are its preferred food during the nonbreeding period.

The oldest recorded Canvasback was a male and at least 22 years, 7 months old when he was shot in California in 1991. He had been banded in the same state in 1969.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Josh Simons

Observation Date: 1/1/09

Observation Time: 2:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Parkway

Common Name: Carolina Wren

Scientific Name: Thryothorus ludovicianus

Comments: This and the titmouse and junco photos were all taken with a Canon 50D and a Canon 500mm f4 lens from the comfort of my kitchen on Moose Hill Parkway. We have feeders that attract lots of birds who land on a nearby lilac bush while waiting for their turn at the feeders.

In terms of processing, I use very little. The images are cropped and very small
adjustments are made to exposure and contrast with sometimes a little extra sharpening applied.

That and the nice, slanting winter sunlight are all there is to it.

More Information: Cornell Lab of Ornithology “All About Birds”

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 1/17/11

Observation Time: 3:40 p.m.

Observation Location: 284 Mountain Street

Common Name: Carolina Wren

Scientific Name: Thryothorus ludovicianus

Comments: Following the SFOC walk on Martin Luther King Day (January 17), while sipping hot cider at Vera Cross’s house at about 3:40 p.m., a pair of Carolina wrens appeared out the window. It was only 20 degrees outside. The wrens were flitting in and out of an old, unused flue, presumably trying to stay warm. When they perched on a nearby branch, they fluffed their feathers for better insulation.

The Carolina Wren is sensitive to cold weather, with the northern populations decreasing markedly after severe winters. Gradually warming winter temperatures over the last century may be responsible for the northward range expansion seen in the late-1900s and early 2000’s.

A pair bond may form between a male and a female at any time of the year, and the pair will stay together for life. Members of a pair stay together on their territory year round, and forage and move around the territory together.

More Information: All About Birds

Carolina Wren

Carolina Wren

Carolina Wren

Observer: Josh Simons

Observation Date: 1/30/11

Observation Time: 1:30 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill area

Common Name: Carolina Wren

Scientific Name: Thryothorus ludovicianus

Comments: For more than 70 years, no Carolina Wrens were recorded during a Christmas Bird Count in Vermont. Then, in 1975, two were spotted. After being observed sporadically on subsequent counts, the bird began making regular appearances in 1991, and its numbers increased steadily from 1999 to 2006. Once a southern species seen rarely during New England’s traditionally cold winters, the wren is now a regular. And it’s not alone. Milder winters and the earlier onset of spring have spurred a variety of species to spread their wings farther north, including Tufted Titmouse, Red-bellied Woodpecker, and Cape May Warbler.

More Information: Cornell Lab of Ornithology “All About Birds”

Carolina Wren

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 4/25/20

Observation Time: 10:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Conservation land at Lakeview St. & Morse St.

Common Name: Carolina Wren

Scientific Name: Thryothorus ludovicianus

Comments: The Carolina Wren is sensitive to cold weather, with the northern populations decreasing markedly after severe winters. Global warming might be responsible for the northward range expansion seen in the late-1900s and early 2000’s.

A pair bond may form between a male and a female at any time of the year, and the pair will stay together for life. Members of a pair stay together on their territory year round, and forage and move around the territory together.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/15/15

Observation Time: 7:35 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Cedar Waxwing

Scientific Name: Bombycilla cedrorum

Comments: These striking birds are typically seen in groups. Their tails look as if they were dipped in yellow paint. See:http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Cedar_Waxwing/id

cedarwaxwing

cedarwaxwing3

cedarwaxwing4

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/15/20

Observation Time: 6:45 a.m.

Observation Location: near Gavins Pond soccer parking area

Common Name: Cedar Waxwing

Scientific Name: Bombycilla cedrorum

Comments: These striking birds are typically seen in groups. Their tails look as if they were dipped in yellow paint.

More Information: http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Cedar_Waxwing/id

Observer: Deb Radovsky

Observation Date: 5/18/2016

Observation Time: N/A

Observation Location: Moose Hill area

Common Name: Cedar Waxwing 

Scientific Name:  Bombycilla cedrorum

Comments: Cedar Waxwings typically travel in groups.

More Information: All About Birds

 Observer: Deb Radovsky

Observation Date: 8/2/20

Observation Time: 6:40 a.m.

Observation Location: along Lake Massapoag

Common Name: Cedar Waxwing 

Scientific Name:  Bombycilla cedrorum

Comments: Cedar Waxwings typically travel in groups.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/16/15

Observation Time: 8:20 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Chestnut-sided Warbler

Scientific Name: Setophaga pensylvanica

Comments: Dazzling woodland warblers migrate through Sharon every spring on their way from South and Central America to Canada. Catching sight of one leaves an indelible impression.

More Information: All About Birds

chestnutwarbler

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/20/13

Observation Time: 4:20 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Chipping Sparrow

Scientific Name: Spizella passerina

Comments: Chipping sparrows are very common in Sharon. They have a distinctive reddish cap above a white eyeline. Their song is described as a reedy trill that sounds a lot like the songs of the pine warbler and the junco.

More Information: All About Birds

Chipping Sparrow

Observer: Deb Radovsky

Observation Date: 4/24/18

Observation Time: 5:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary, near bird feeders

Common Names: Chipping Sparrow and Dark-eyed Junco

Scientific Names: Spizella passerina and Junco hyemalis

Comments: If you want to get an idea of what birds are around, spend some time watching the feeders at the Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary. You’ll see everything from hummingbirds to wild turkeys.

More Information: All About Chipping Sparrows and All About Dark-eyed Juncos

Observer: Ilan Fisher

Observation Date: 6/12/2018

Observation Time: N/A

Observation Location: near Lake Massapoag

Common Name: Common Grackle

Scientific Name: Quiscalus quiscula

Comments: I love this guy and he loves this feeder. With his yellow eyes and black cape, I call him “Count Gracula.” He is fun to watch.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Deb Radovsky

Observation Date: 2/26/18

Observation Time: N/A

Observation Location: Lake Massapoag

Common Name: Common Merganser

Scientific Name: Mergus merganser

Comments: Common Mergansers are sometimes called sawbills, fish ducks, or goosanders. The word “merganser” comes from the Latin and roughly translates to “plunging goose”—a good name for this very large and often submerged duck.

Young Common Mergansers leave their nest hole within a day or so of hatching. The flightless chicks leap from the nest entrance and tumble to the forest floor. The mother protects the chicks, but they catch all of their own food. They start by diving for aquatic insects and switch over to fish at about 12 days old.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/5/18

Observation Time: 6:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Common Raven

Scientific Name: Corvus corax

Comments: Ravens are considerably larger than crows. Their call is different and they travel in pairs, unlike crows, which travel in larger groups. For more information, see: http://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/common-raven. Sharon is at the southern edge of the raven’s range. Be sure to scroll down and check out the map showing how the raven’s range is expected to retreat northward as the climate heats up.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/11/18

Observation Time: 8:35 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Common Yellowthroat

Scientific Name: Geoothlypis trichas

Comments: Common yellowthroats are typically found in or near wetlands. They are a type of warbler, with a distinctive black mask that is reminiscent of a raccoon. Their song sounds like, “witchety, witchety, witchety.”

More Information: All About Birds

 

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/11/20

Observation Time: 10:00 a.m.

Observation Location: near Billings Brook wetlands under the high tension lines across the street from Gavins Pond soccer fields

Common Name: Common Yellowthroat

Scientific Name: Geoothlypis trichas

Comments: Common yellowthroats are typically found in or near wetlands. They are a type of warbler, with a distinctive black mask that is reminiscent of a raccoon. Their song sounds like, “witchety, witchety, witchety.”

More Information: All About Birds

I took this photo at the same place two days later:

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/14/14

Observation Time: 2:35 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Common yellowthroat

Scientific Name: Geothlypis trichas

Comments: This masked warbler is typically found near wetlands or ponds.

More Information: All About Birds

Common Yellowthroat

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/15/15

Observation Time: 10:45 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Common Yellowthroat

Scientific Name: Geoothlypis trichas

Comments: Common yellowthroats are typically found in or near wetlands. They are a type of warbler, with a distinctive black mask that is reminiscent of a raccoon. Their song sounds like, “witchety, witchety, witchety.”

More Information: All About Birds

yellowthroat

 

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/26/19

Observation Time: 1:30 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm (formerly the Kendall Estate)

Common Name: Common Yellowthroat

Scientific Name: Geoothlypis trichas

Comments: Common yellowthroats are typically found in or near wetlands. They are a type of warbler, with a distinctive black mask that is reminiscent of a raccoon. Their song sounds like, “witchety, witchety, witchety.”

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 10/1/11

Observation Time: 9:10 a.m.

Observation Location: 4 Gavins Pond Road

Common Name: Cooper’s hawk

Scientific Name: Accipiter cooperii

Comments: This juvenile female Cooper’s hawk alit in the dogwood tree right outside my living room window as I was working at my desk. Without getting up, I reached for my camera and snapped this photo through the window just before it flew away.

Cooper’s hawks look like Sharp-shinned hawks, but Cooper’s hawks have a more rounded tail. Also, the streaks on the breast of a juvenile Cooper’s hawk are narrower than those on the breast of a sharp-shinned hawk.

More Information: All About Birds

Cooper's Hawk

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 8/18/12

Observation Time: 5:20 p.m.

Observation Location: 4 Gavins Pond Road (back yard)

Common Name: Cooper’s hawk

Scientific Name: Accipiter cooperii

Comments: This Cooper’s hawk perched on a branch in my back yard, and I photographed it through the window. Note the rounded tail, which differentiates it from a sharp-shinned hawk.

More Information: All About Birds

Cooper's Hawk

Observer: Josh Simons

Observation Date: 1/1/09

Observation Time: 2:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Parkway

Common Name: Dark-eyed Junco

Scientific Name: Junco hyemalis

Comments: This and the titmouse and wren photos were all taken with a Canon 50D and a Canon 500mm f4 lens from the comfort of my kitchen on Moose Hill Parkway. We have feeders that attract lots of birds who land on a nearby lilac bush while waiting for their turn at the feeders.

In terms of processing, I use very little. The images are cropped and very small
adjustments are made to exposure and contrast with sometimes a little extra
sharpening applied.

That and the nice, slanting winter sunlight are all there is to it.

More Information: Cornell Lab of Ornithology “All About Birds”

Dark-Eyed Junco

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 3/8/14

Observation Time: 10:55 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Dark-eyed Junco

Scientific Name: Junco hyemalis

Comments: Juncos are winter birds in Sharon.

More Information: Cornell Lab of Ornithology “All About Birds”

Previous, Subsequent, or Similar Sightings:

Dark-eyed Junco, 1/1/09

Dark-eyed Junco, 5/4/11

Dark-Eyed Junco

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 4/18/11

Observation Time: 11:25 a.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond

Common Name: Dark-eyed Junco

Scientific Name: Junco hyemalis

Comments: Juncos are a type of sparrow commonly seen around Sharon in winter. This individual will soon be heading north for summer.

More Information: Cornell Lab of Ornithology “All About Birds”

Dark-Eyed Junco

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/7/19

Observation Time: 7:42 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Double-crested Cormorant

Scientific Name: Phalacrocorax auritus

Comments: When migrating, cormorants fly loosely in lines, as opposed to the familiar “vees” that geese use.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 9/1/12

Observation Time: 4:40 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond outflow pool

Common Name: Double-crested Cormorant

Scientific Name: Phalacrocorax auritus

Comments: Most commonly seen cormorant in the East and usually the only one seen inland. Feeds by diving and swimming underwater, eating mostly fish. After feeding, often stands with wings outstretched to dry.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Deb Radovsky

Observation Date: 10/27/17

Observation Time: early morning

Observation Location: Lake Massapoag

Common Name: Double-crested Cormorants

Scientific Name: Phalacrocorax auritus

Comments: The double-crest of the Double-crested Cormorant is only visible on adults during breeding season. The crests are white in cormorants from Alaska, and black in other regions.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Rick Dumont

Observation Date: 1/26/08

Observation Time: 4:15 p.m.

Observation Location: Front yard

Common Name: Downy Woodpecker

Scientific Name: Picoides pubescens

Comments: First the male showed up, then along came the female. The male has a moustache and red stripe while the female is clean-shaven and stripeless.

More Information: All-Birds.com

Downy Woodpecker

Downy Woodpecker

Observer: Josh Simons

Observation Date: 2/16/14

Observation Time: 9:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill area

Common Name: Downy Woodpecker

Scientific Name: Dendrocopos pubescens

Comments: Dendrocopos means “tree dagger” and “pubescens” refers to its downy hairs of puberty compared to those of the Hairy woodpecker, D. villosus.[The Dictionary of American Bird Names by Ernest A. Choate]

More Information: All About Birds

Downy Woodpecker

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 4/15/20

Observation Time: 2:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Conservation land near Sandy Ridge Circle

Common Name: Downy Woodpecker

Scientific Name: Dendrocopos pubescens

Comments: Dendrocopos means “tree dagger” and “pubescens” refers to its downy hairs of puberty compared to those of the Hairy woodpecker, D. villosus. [The Dictionary of American Bird Names by Ernest A. Choate]

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Josh Simons

Observation Date: 5/10/20

Observation Time: 1:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill area

Common Name: Downy Woodpecker

Scientific Name: Dryobates pubescens

Comments:  “Pubescens” refers to its downy hairs of puberty compared to those of the Hairy woodpecker, D. villosus. [The Dictionary of American Bird Names by Ernest A. Choate]

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/16/13

Observation Time: 6:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Downy Woodpecker

Scientific Name: Picoides pubescens

Comments: This pair of small, common woodpeckers was hollowing out a nesting cavity in a dead tree.

More Information: All About Birds

Downy Woodpecker

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/5/18

Observation Time: 7:20 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Downy Woodpecker

Scientific Name: Dendrocopos pubescens

Comments: Dendrocopos means “tree dagger” and “pubescens” refers to its downy hairs of puberty compared to those of the Hairy woodpecker, D. villosus.[The Dictionary of American Bird Names by Ernest A. Choate]

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Ilan Fisher

Observation Date: 8/22/20

Observation Time: 2:00 p.m.

Observation Location: near intersection of Beach & Harding Streets

Common Name: Downy Woodpecker

Scientific Name: Dryobates pubescens

Comments:  “Pubescens” refers to its downy hairs of puberty compared to those of the Hairy woodpecker, D. villosus. [The Dictionary of American Bird Names by Ernest A. Choate]

Downy woodpeckers look very much like hairy woopeckers, but downy woodpeckers are much smaller than hairy woodpeckers. To learn more about how to tell them apart, see: Project Feederwatch.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Ilan Fisher

Observation Date: 8/6/08

Observation Time: 2:00 p.m.

Observation Location: 66 N. Main Street

Common Name: Downy Woodpecker

Scientific Name: Picoides pubescens

Comments: Just visiting in a tree in front of the house.

More Information: All-Birds.com

Downy Woodpecker

Observer: Faith Berkland

Observation Date: 10/8/17

Observation Time: 5:15 p.m.

Observation Location: Fence of horse corral, Willow St, Foxboro

Common Name: Eastern Bluebird

Scientific Name: Sialia sialis

Comments: 3 bluebirds were spotted here, 1 bright blue, one maybe an immature male because less bright, and one female.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 4/17/20

Observation Time: 2:00 p.m.

Observation Location: conservation land near Morse & Lakeview

Common Name: Eastern Bluebird

Scientific Name: Sialia sialis

Comments: The Sharon Friends of Conservation maintains six bluebird nesting boxes at this site. Most of them are occupied by tree swallows.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 4/25/09

Observation Time: 11:05 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Eastern Bluebird

Scientific Name: Sialia sialis

Comments: Female (above) and male (below)

More Information: Cornell Lab of Ornithology “All About Birds”

Eastern Bluebird

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 4/25/20

Observation Time: 9:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm (TTOR)

Common Name: Eastern Bluebird

Scientific Name: Sialia sialis

Comments: The Sharon Friends of Conservation maintains some bluebird nesting boxes at this site. Volunteers monitor these nesting boxes and keep track of the bluebirds’ nesting activities.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Faith Berkland

Observation Date: 4/14/18

Observation Time: 3:30 p.m.

Observation Location: 302 Mansfield Street

Common Name: Eastern Bluebird

Scientific Name: Sialia sialis

More Information: All About Birds or Animalia

 

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Contact Information:  lauenstein@comcast.net   (781) 784-2986

Observation Date: 5/1/18

Observation Time: 8:45 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Eastern Bluebird

Scientific Name: Sialia sialis

Comments: This male bluebird caught a spider and brought it back to the nest to feed its young.

More Information: All About Birds 

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/11/20

Observation Time: 8:10 a.m.

Observation Location: field near Gavins Pond dam

Common Name: Eastern Bluebird

Scientific Name: Sialia sialis

Comments: The male bluebird caught an insect and gave it to its mate. The Sharon Friends of Conservation maintains six bluebird nesting boxes near Gavins Pond. Most of them are occupied by tree swallows.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/13/19

Observation Time: 11:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Eastern Bluebird

Scientific Name: Sialia sialis

Comments: This male was guarding the territory near a nesting box where his mate had laid her blue eggs.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/14/14

Observation Time: 2:25 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Eastern Bluebird

Scientific Name: Sialia sialis

Comments: Sharon Fiends of Conservation maintain about 30 bluebird houses in town. Volunteers check the bluebird houses weekly, and the data is used to help determine the optimum locations for bluebird houses.

More Information: All About Birds

Eastern Bluebird

Eastern Bluebird

Observer: Deb Radovsky

Observation Date: 5/2/18

Observation Time: 6:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary (Wood Thrush Trail)

Common Name: Eastern Bluebird

Scientific Name: Sialia sialis

Comments: You can find Eastern Bluebirds in open country with patchy vegetation and large trees or nest boxes. Meadows, old fields, and golf courses are good places. Bluebirds typically sit in the open on power lines or along fences, with an alert, vertical posture. When they drop to the ground after an insect, they make a show of it, with fluttering wings and a fairly slow approach, followed by a quick return to the perch.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/3/15

Observation Time: 1:55 p.m.

Observation Location: field near Gavins Pond

Common Name: Eastern Bluebird

Scientific Name: Sialia sialis

Comments: I found a couple of sky-blue eggs in one of the nesting boxes near Gavins Pond. Then I saw the parents. As I was snapping photos of the male bluebird, it suddenly stretched out its wing. A moment later it was gone.

More Information: National Audubon Society

 

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/8/19

Observation Time: 9:40 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Eastern Bluebird

Scientific Name: Sialia sialis

Comments: This male was guarding the territory surrounding a nesting box where his mate had laid her blue eggs.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Rita Corey

Observation Date: 6/23/19

Observation Time: 3:30 p.m.

Observation Location: 282 Mountain Street (back yard)

Common Name: Eastern Bluebird

Scientific Name: Sialia sialis

Comments: This bluebird was checking out the bluebird house. Note that the entrance hole has been gnawed by a squirrel. The extra piece of wood that’s attached around the hole makes it harder for squirrels to enlarge the hole enough to get inside.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 9/30/10

Observation Time: 9:25 a.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Road near soccer fields

Common Name: Eastern Bluebird

Scientific Name: Sialia sialis

Comments: Bluebirds are becoming an increasingly common sight in the open fields bordered by woods in the vicinity of the soccer fields on Gavins Pond Road, thanks to the nesting boxes provided by SFOC.

More Information: Cornell Lab of Ornithology “All About Birds”

Eastern Bluebird

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/27/11

Observation Time: 6:10 p.m.

Observation Location: near Gavins Pond

Common Name: Bluebird (Immature)

Scientific Name: Sialia sialis

Comments: SFOC has installed 38 bluebird nesting boxes around Sharon. This young bluebird is among the first this year to roll off SFOC’s “bluebird factory” assembly line. The speckles on its breast and noticeable white eye-ring indicate that it is a juvenile. Other broods have not yet fledged.

More Information: Cornell Lab of Ornithology “All About Birds”

Bluebird (Immature)

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/15/10

Observation Time: 10:50 a.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Road soccer field parking lot

Common Name: Bluebird (juvenile)

Scientific Name: Sialia sialis

Comments: Young bluebirds that recently left the nest have distinctive white spots on their wings. The presence of this juvenile at the Gavins Pond Road soccer field parking lot indicates the success of SFOC efforts to provide nesting boxes in the vicinity.

More Information: Cornell Lab of Ornithology “All About Birds”

Bluebird (juvenile)

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 10/9/14

Observation Time: 4:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond soccer field

Common Name: Eastern Bluebird

Scientific Name: Sialia Sialis

Comments: This bluebird was still hanging around Sharon in October. Bluebirds actually overwinter in Sharon, feeding on seeds. On cold nights they huddle in groups inside nesting boxes to keep warm.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 4/25/13

Observation Time: 2:30 p.m.

Observation Location: near Gavins Pond Dam

Common Name: Eastern Bluebird (male)

Scientific Name: Sialia sialis

Comments: This male bluebird was guarding a nest with five sky-blue eggs in a nesting box provided by Kurt Buermann, President of the Sharon Friends of Conservation. The blue color is more or less vivid depending on the brightness and angle of the ambient light.

More Information: All About Birds

Eastern Bluebird (male)

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/19/20

Observation Time: 9:50 a.m.

Observation Location: field near Gavins Pond dam

Common Name: Eastern kingbird

Scientific Name: Tyrannus tyrannus

Comments: Kingbirds are members of the flycatcher family. The tip of the tail looks like it was dipped in white paint. Their call has been likened to the sound of arcing electricity.

In summer kingbirds eat mostly flying insects. Pairs maintain a breeding territory and defend it vigorously against all other kingbirds. In winter along the Amazon, however, they have a very different lifestyle: they travel in flocks and eat fruit.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/14/20

Observation Time: 4:40 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm (TTOR)

Common Name: Eastern Kingbird

Scientific Name: Tyrannus tyrannus

Comments: Kingbirds are members of the flycatcher family. The tip of the tail looks like it was dipped in white paint. Their call has been likened to the sound of arcing electricity.

In summer kingbirds eat mostly flying insects. Pairs maintain a breeding territory and defend it vigorously against all other kingbirds. In winter along the Amazon, however, they have a very different lifestyle: they travel in flocks and eat fruit.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Deb Radovsky

Observation Date: 4/23/18

Observation Time: 6:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary, Billings Loop

Common Name: Eastern Towhee

Scientific Name: Pipilo erythrophthalmus

Comments: The Towhee’s song sounds like, “Drink your tea,” making it easy to remember when you’re in the woods. It’s call sounds like its name, “Toe-wee.”

Eastern Towhees are often victims of the parasitic Brown-headed Cowbird. Female cowbirds lay eggs in towhee nests, then leave the towhees to raise their cowbird young. In some areas cowbirds lay eggs in more than half of all towhee nests. Towhees, unlike some other birds, show no ability to recognize or remove the imposter’s eggs. Female cowbirds typically take out a towhee egg when laying their own, making the swap harder to notice.

More Information: All About Birds 

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/11/19

Observation Time: 7:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Eastern Towhee (male)

Scientific Name: Pipilo erythrophthalmus

Comments: Towhees are common birds in Sharon, especially along edges between woods and open fields, but they are heard more than seen. The male’s song sounds like he’s singing, “Drink your tea.” They are sometimes seen scratching among dead leaves on the ground, presumably looking for insects to eat.

Note its deep red eye.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/15/14

Observation Time: 3:40 p.m.

Observation Location: field near Gavins Pond dam

Common Name: Eastern Towhee

Scientific Name: Pipilo erythrophthalmus

Comments: The Eastern towhees is the largest member of the sparrow family. Its call, “Drink your tea.” can be heard much more often than it is seen, but once you become aware of them, you will realize that they are very common in Sharon.

More Information: All About Birds

Eastern Towhee

Eastern Towhee

Eastern Towhee

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/19/19

Observation Time: 7:45 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Eastern Towhee (male)

Scientific Name: Pipilo erythrophthalmus

Comments: Towhees are common birds in Sharon, especially along edges between woods and open fields, but they are heard more than seen. The male’s song sounds like he’s singing, “Drink your tea.” They are sometimes seen scratching among dead leaves on the ground, presumably looking for insects to eat.

Note its deep red eye.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/27/19

Observation Time: 5:30 p.m.

Observation Location: Under high tension wires across the street from Ward’s Berry Farm

Common Name: Eastern Towhee (male)

Scientific Name: Pipilo erythrophthalmus

Comments: This male towhee tried to scare me away by repeatedly raising one wing or the other to make itself look more intimidating. Note its deep red eye.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/4/11

Observation Time: 1:50 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond

Common Name: Eastern towhee

Scientific Name: Pipilo erythrophthalmus

Comments: Towhees are the largest of the sparrows. They are quite common in Sharon. They have a distinctive call that sounds like “Drink your tea.”

More Information: All About Birds.org

Rufus-Sided towhee

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/4/13

Observation Time: 5:55 p.m.

Observation Location: Soccer parking area on Gavins Pond Road

Common Name: Eastern Towhee

Scientific Name: Pipilo erythrophthalmus

Comments: The Eastern Towhee is our largest sparrow. This male was scuffing for food in the dry leaves on the ground in a grove of trees beside the soccer parking lot. The racket he was making attracted my attention.

The call of the Towhee, which sounds like “Toe-wee,” accounts for its name. It has another call that is said to sound like “Drink Your Tea.” Once you learn to recognize the Towhee’s call, you will begin to realize that these shy birds are quite common around here, even though you may not see them in the foliage.

More Information: All About Birds

Eastern Towhee