Sightings – Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/9/13

Observation Time: 3:55 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond area

Common Name: Northern Flicker

Scientific Name: Colaptes auratus

Comments: Flickers are woodpeckers, but they are unusual in that they eat ants and beetles on the ground.

More Information: All About Birds

Flicker

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/24/11

Observation Time: 10:45 a.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Road

Common Name: Northern Flicker (fledgling)

Scientific Name: Colaptes auratus

Comments: This fledgling Northern Flicker was on the ground at first, but it hopped over to a tamarack tree and climbed up, pecking from time to time under the bark and calling repeatedly as if it wanted its mother.

More Information: Cornell Lab of Ornithology “All About Birds”

Flicker Fledgling

Flicker Fledgling

Flicker Fledgling

Flicker Fledgling

Flicker Fledgling

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/2/11

Observation Time: 4:50 p.m.

Observation Location: near Gavins Pond

Common Name: Northern mockingbird

Scientific Name: Mimus polyglottos

Comments: As both the common name and the scientific name suggest, the northern mockingbird mimics other birds and other sounds in its environment. If you are familiar with bird songs, you can sometimes get clues about what other bird species might be around by listening to a mockingbird.

More Information: All About Birds

Northern Mockingbird

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/6/10

Observation Time: 4:15 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond

Common Name: Northern mockingbird

Scientific Name: Mimus polyglottos

Comments: Mockingbirds repeat whatever they are mocking 3 or 4 times. That differentiates them from the other two mimics found in Sharon, brown thrashers (that repeat twice), and catbirds (that repeat only once).

More Information: All About Birds

Northern Mockingbird

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 10/11/09

Observation Time: 4:20 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond

Common Name: Northern Shoveler duck

Scientific Name: Anas clypeata

Comments: This duck gets its name from its large bill.

More Information: All About Birds.org

Northern Shoveler Duck

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/1/18

Observation Time: 10:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Northern Waterthrush

Scientific Name: Parkesia noveboracensis

Comments: The northern waterthrush is actually a type of warbler. It looks a lot like an ovenbird, which is also a warbler. This one was seen near the boardwalk through the wetlands at Moose Hill.

More Information: All About Birds


Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/11/18

Observation Time: 12:50

Observation Location: meadow at Morse and Lakeview

Common Name: Northern Waterthrush

Scientific Name: Parkesia noveboracensis

Comments: The northern waterthrush is actually a type of warbler. It looks a lot like an ovenbird, which is also a warbler. This one was seen in the town-owned meadow at the junction of Morse and Lakeview Streets.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/12/16

Observation Time: 9:50 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Center

Common Name: Northern Waterthrush

Scientific Name: Parkesia noveboracensis

Comments: A bird of northern forests, the Northern Waterthrush is in the warbler family. It sings its loud, ringing song from wooded swamps, bogs and streams. It migrates through Sharon in spring and fall, bobbing its tail in the woods near water.

More Information: All About Birds

Northern waterthrush

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/16/20

Observation Time: 6:45 a.m.

Observation Location: near Gavins Pond

Common Name: Olive-sided flycatcher

Scientific Name: Contopus cooperi

Comments: I encountered this bird perched about 30 feet up in a leafless tree on the right side of the trail leading from the soccer fields to Gavins Pond dam, where the trail emerges from the woods and bends left toward the dam.

The white patches were quite distinctive and caught my eye immediately as I approached from a distance. I was astonished to see this bird, as I had never seen anything before in Sharon with such dramatic white patches. It seemed to me as if such eye-catching white patches might be an evolutionary disadvantage because they would be noticeable to hawks and other predators.
Speaking of predators, I saw what I think was a weasel or a mink in the bushes near the far left corner of the inner soccer field parking lot. It was surprisingly small – about 10” to 12” long I’d say. Unfortunately I did not get a photo of it as it scampered away.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Michael Scutari Acciavatti  

Observation Date: 12/6/2018

Observation Location: Prescott Pond, Lakwood Drive, Stoughton

Common Name: Osprey

Scientific Name: Pandion haliaetus

Comments: Ospreys can also be seen in Sharon. They are most commonly seen over a lake or pond, where they dive for fish.

More Information: Wikipedia

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/12/16

Observation Time: 7:45 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Center

Common Name: Ovenbird

Scientific Name: Seiurus aurocapilla

Comments: Ovenbirds are in the warbler family. Their insistent “teacher, teacher, teacher” call is one of the most commonly heard birdsongs in the woods around Sharon. They are called ovenbirds because their nests, which are built on the ground, resemble little ovens.

More Information: All About Birds 

Ovenbird8

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/13/19

Observation Time: 10:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Ovenbird

Scientific Name: Seiurus aurocapilla

Comments: This is one of the most common birds in the woods at Moose Hill. Learn to recognize its song, an insistent, piercing ‘tea-Cher, tea-Cher, tea-CHER, Tea-CHER, TEA-CHER’, and you will be able to find them.

Ovenbirds are warblers. Their name comes from the mounded nest they build on the ground, which resembles an oven.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/16/14

Observation Time: 6:20 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Ovenbird

Scientific Name: Seiurus aurocapilla

Comments: The ovenbird’s rapid-fire “teacher-teacher-teacher” song rings out in summer hardwood forests from the Mid-Atlantic states to northeastern British Columbia. It’s so loud that it may come as a surprise to find this inconspicuous warbler strutting like a tiny rooster across the dim forest floor. Its olive-brown back and spotted breast are excellent disguise as it gleans invertebrates from the leaf litter. Its nest, a leaf-covered dome resembling an old-fashioned outdoor oven, gives the ovenbird its name.

More Information: All About Birds.org

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/30/15

Observation Time: 1:00 p.m.

Observation Location: woods beyond Everett Street

Common Name: Ovenbird

Scientific Name: Seiurus aurocapilla

Comments: Ovenbirds are in the warbler family. Their insistent “teacher, teacher, teacher” call is one of the most commonly heard birdsongs in the woods around Sharon. They are called ovenbirds because their nests, which are built on the ground, resemble little ovens.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Jason Platt

Observation Date: 5/8/18

Observation Time: 8:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Ovenbird

Scientific Name: Seiurus aurocapilla

Comments: The ovenbird’s rapid-fire “teacher-teacher-teacher” song rings out in summer hardwood forests from the Mid-Atlantic states to northeastern British Columbia. It’s so loud that it may come as a surprise to find this inconspicuous warbler strutting like a tiny rooster across the dim forest floor. Its olive-brown back and spotted breast are excellent disguise as it gleans invertebrates from the leaf litter. Its nest, a leaf-covered dome resembling an old-fashioned outdoor oven, gives the ovenbird its name.

More Information: All About Birds.org

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/8/19

Observation Time: 11:13 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Ovenbird

Scientific Name: Seiurus aurocapilla

Comments: This is one of the most common birds in the woods at Moose Hill. Learn to recognize its song, an insistent and loud ‘tea-Cher, tea-Cher, tea-CHER, Tea-CHER, TEA-CHER’, and you will be able to find them.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/23/16

Observation Time: 11:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Center

Common Name: Ovenbird

Scientific Name: Seiurus aurocapilla

Comments: Ovenbirds are in the warbler family. Their insistent “teacher, teacher, teacher” call is one of the most commonly heard birdsongs in the woods around Sharon. They are called ovenbirds because their nests, which are built on the ground, resemble little ovens.

More Information: All About Birds 

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/3/20

Observation Time: 10:00 a.m.

Observation Location: pine woods by Gavins Pond

Common Name: Palm Warbler

Scientific Name: Setophaga palmarum

Comments: Palm warblers pass through Sharon in late April and early May on their northward migration. They sometimes mingle with other species of warblers. This one was in the company of a yellow-rumped warbler and a black-and-white warbler.
You can monitor the bird migration in spring by keeping an eye on the live radar map at: http://birdcast.info/live-migration-maps/

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/14/14

Observation Time: 2:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Phoebe

Scientific Name: Sayornis phoebe

Comments: The song of the Phoebe sounds like its name. You can find and play bird songs online. The more bird calls you memorize, the more bird species you will be able to identify in the field, where the birds themselves are often concealed by foliage.

More Information: All About Birds

Phoebe

Observer: Jason Platt

Observation Date: 5/8/18

Observation Time: 8:15 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Phoebe

Scientific Name: Sayornis phoebe

Comments: One of our most familiar eastern flycatchers, the Eastern Phoebe’s raspy “phoebe” call is a frequent sound around yards and farms in spring and summer.

More Information: All About Birds.org

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 8/1/10

Observation Time: 7:50 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Road soccer field

Common Name: Phoebe

Scientific Name: Sayornis phoebe

Comments: Phoebes are flycatchers.

More Information: All About Birds

Phoebe

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 2/25/20

Observation Time: 1:10 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Pileated Woodpecker

Scientific Name: Dryocopus pileatus

Comments: I spotted this magnificent, large, red-crested woodpecker behind the barn on the Billings Loop. You will improve your chances of sighting one of these birds by learning their calls and the sound of their drumming, which is different from that of other smaller woodpeckers.

More Information: Audubon Guide to N. American Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 4/27/18

Observation Time: 9:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Pileated Woodpecker

Scientific Name: Dryocopus pileatus

Comments: This large woodpecker (about the size of a crow) was peeling bark off a tree to get at the bugs underneath. Its tongue is visible in the last photo below.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/11/19

Observation Time: 8:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Pileated Woodpecker

Scientific Name: Dryocopus pileatus

Comments: I found this bird by following the sound of its hammering. It was in the exact same location as it was on May 7, 2019. Shortly after I took this photo, I saw it mate with another pileated woodpecker.

More Information: Audubon Guide to N. American Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/7/19

Observation Time: 7:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Pileated Woodpecker

Scientific Name: Dryocopus pileatus

Comments: This magnificent crow-sized bird was the inspiration for the cartoon character Woody Woodpecker. Unfortunately, its cousin, the ivory-billed woodpecker, has gone extinct.

More Information: Audubon Guide to N. American Birds

Observer: Will Sweet

Observation Date: 1/11/09

Observation Time: 10:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Backyard bird feeder

Common Name: Pine Siskin

Scientific Name: Carduelis pinus

Comments: There was a flock of 43 Pine Siskins on my thistle feeders.

More Information: Cornell Lab of Ornithology “All About Birds”

Pine Siskin

Observer: Deb Radovsky

Observation Date: 12/15/18

Observation Time: morning

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary (near feeders)

Common Name: Pine Siskin

Scientific Name: Spinus pinus

Comments: Every couple of years, Pine Siskins make unpredictable movements called irruptions into southern and eastern North America. Though they’re erratic, these movements may not be entirely random. Banding data suggest that some birds may fly west-east across the continent while others move north-south.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/2/20

Observation Time: 1:00 p.m.

Observation Location: 4 Gavins Pond Road (my back yard)

Common Name: Pine Warbler

Scientific Name: Setophaga pinus

Comments: Pine warblers are typically found in pine groves. Many warbler species migrate through Sharon in May on their way to nesting areas farther north, but pine warblers nest here in Sharon, and can be found here all summer.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: May 24, 2015

Observation Time: 5:20 p.m.

Observation Location: along Beaver Brook near the train station

Common Name: Pine Warbler

Scientific Name: Setophaga pinus

Comments: Notice that this pine warbler is in a pine tree. Many warbler species migrate through Sharon in May on their way to nesting areas farther north, but pine warblers nest here in Sharon, and can be found in summer.

More Information: All About Birds

Pine warbler5

 

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: May 27, 2019

Observation Time: 1:55 p.m.

Observation Location: Conservation land near Morse & Lakeview

Common Name: Pine Warbler

Scientific Name: Setophaga pinus

Comments: Pine warblers nest here in Sharon, and can be found in pine woods in summer. The song of the pine warbler is hard to distinguish from the song of the chipping sparrow – unless you are a pine warbler!

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/31/14

Observation Time: 5:30 p.m.

Observation Location: Trail through woods beside Gavins Pond

Common Name: Pine warbler

Scientific Name: Setophaga pinus

Comments: The song of the pine warbler is hard to distinguish from the reedy trill of a chipping sparrow.

More Information: All About Birds

Pine Warbler

Pine Warbler

Pine Warbler

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/11/20

Observation Time: 10:50 a.m.

Observation Location: under the power lines across the street from the Gavins Pond soccer fields

Common Name: Prairie Warbler

Scientific Name: Setophaga discolor

Comments: Prairie warblers are found in scrubby fields and forest edges throughout the eastern and south-central United States. Unlike many other warblers that migrate through Sharon in spring and fall, the prairie warbler hangs around all summer. You can find them in brushy areas under power lines, especially if you learn to recognize their ascending trill. This habitat is also good for indigo buntings.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Deb Radovsky

Observation Date: 5/12/18

Observation Time: 9:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm (TTOR), Powerline Trail

Common Name: Prairie Warbler

Scientific Name: Setophaga discolor

Comments: The Prairie Warbler is found in scrubby fields and forests throughout the eastern and south-central United States, not on the prairies. Unlike many other warblers that migrate through Sharon in spring and fall, the Prairie Warbler hangs around all summer.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/18/20

Observation Time: 10:25 a.m.

Observation Location: under the power lines across the street from the Gavins Pond soccer fields

Common Name: Prairie Warbler

Scientific Name: Setophaga discolor

Comments: Prairie warblers are found in scrubby fields and forest edges throughout the eastern and south-central United States. Unlike many other warblers that migrate through Sharon in spring and fall, the prairie warbler hangs around all summer. You can find them in brushy areas under power lines, especially if you learn to recognize their ascending trill. This habitat is also good for indigo buntings.

Note the reddish patch on its back.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/22/15

Observation Time: 4:20 p.m.

Observation Location: near Gavins Pond

Common Name: Prairie Warbler

Scientific Name: Setophagia discolor

Comments: Prairie warblers can be found in unforested areas such as those under the high-tension lines. I encountered this one in a field near Gavins Pond. If you learn to recognize their song, you will find them much easier.

More Information: All About Birds

Prairie Warbler5

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/23/14

Observation Time: 5:15 p.m.

Observation Location: field near Gavins Pond dam

Common Name: Prairie warbler

Scientific Name: Setophaga discolor

Comments: Prairie warblers are typically found in open fields and under power lines. Listen for their ascending trill.

More Information: All About Birds

Prairie Warbler

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/6/15

Observation Time: 3:25 p.m.

Observation Location: field near Gavins Pond

Common Name: Prairie Warbler

Scientific Name: Setophaga discolor

Comments: This striking yellow and black warbler has a high-pitched trill that ascends. It can be seen in open fields and under power lines all summer in Sharon.

More Information: All About Birds

Warbler

 

Observer: Jason Platt

Observation Date: 5/8/18

Observation Time: 8:30 a.m.

Observation Location: under power lines at Moose Hill

Common Name: Prairie Warbler

Scientific Name: Setophaga discolor

Comments: This striking yellow and black warbler has a high-pitched trill that ascends. It can be seen in open fields and under power lines all summer in Sharon.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/17/13

Observation Time: 4:30 p.m.

Observation Location: field near Gavins Pond

Common Name: Prairie warbler

Scientific Name: Setophaga discolor

Comments: Prairie warblers are not hard to find in fields and cleared areas under high tension lines in Sharon from May to August. Listen for their ascending trill.

More Information: All About Birds

Prairie Warbler

Prairie Warbler

Prairie Warbler

Prairie Warbler

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/2/19

Observation Time: 1:20 p.m.

Observation Location: on the bluff beneath the power lines that parallel So. Walpole St.

Common Name: Prairie Warbler

Scientific Name: Setophaga discolor

Comments: Prairie warblers are found in scrubby fields and forests throughout the eastern and south-central United States, not on the prairies. Unlike many other warblers that migrate through Sharon in spring and fall, the Prairie Warbler hangs around all summer. You can find them in brushy areas under power lines, especially if you learn to recognize their ascending trill.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Josh Simons

Observation Date: 6/25/11

Observation Time: 1:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill area

Common Name: Purple Finch

Scientific Name: Carpodacus purpureus

Comments: Probably decreased in Northeast in late 19th century after introduction of House Sparrow. In recent decades has declined further in that area, possibly owing to competition with House Finch.

More Information: audubon.org or All About Birds

Purple Finch

Observer: Rebecca Hickman

Observation Date: 7/17/12

Observation Time: n/a

Observation Location: Back yard

Common Name: Rabbit, Hawk, and Turkeys

Scientific Name: n/a

Comments: This past week, beginning last weekend, has been like watching an episode of National Geograhpic in my back yard. I’m exaggerating, but not by much..

I enjoy watching the little bunny that has taken up residency under our shed in our back yard.. I’m outside a lot, and I see him munching clover all the time.

Sunday morning I was outside having my morning cup of joe, and watching the bunny hop around on the freshly mowed lawn. Just then, what I’m assuming was a hawk came and snatched him. It happened so suddenly! At first I gasped and weakly yelled “no!” as the big bird of prey flew off with the fluffy guy. The area beyond our back yard is heavily wooded, and the trees are very tall so much of the aerial view is obscured by them and I didn’t see much more. I would have known it was a hawk with more certainty if I saw it flying more. My only good view of him was by the back of his wings when he came down, and took off. It was sad to see the bunny go, but mostly it was an amazing thing to see and I’m glad I got too see such a moment in person.

Then, yesterday I went outside to grill some hot dogs and there were two big turkeys in the yard. I grabbed my toddler and brought him out for a peek, but I knew to stay close to the safety of the door. I know from past experience that turkeys can be aggressive. The experience was when my curiousity brought me close to a pack of turkeys while I was driving in Scituate. The turkeys charged and gobble- gobbled and attacked the tires of our mini van. I was so startled that I told my husband to lock the doors. I started laughing at the silliness of my reaction, but when I saw that he actually DID lock his door, I laughed even more.

Observer: Vin Zollo

Observation Date: 11/30/18

Observation Time: morning

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Red Crossbill

Scientific Name: Loxia curvirostra

Comments: The Red Crossbill is so dependent upon conifer seeds it even feeds them to its young. Consequently, it can breed any time it finds a sufficiently large cone crop, even in the depths of winter. A flock of about 20 red crossbills has been repeatedly sighted at Moose Hill through the winter of 2018-2019 until at least May 21, 2019.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Josh Simons

Observation Date: 2/9/11

Observation Time: 10:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill area

Common Name: Red-bellied Woodpecker

Scientific Name: Melanerpes carolinus

Comments: These birds have extended their breeding range north over the last 100 years.

More Information: All About Birds

Red-Bellied Woodpecker

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 3/8/14

Observation Time: 11:10 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Red-bellied Woodpecker

Scientific Name: Melanerpes carolinus

Comments: Red-bellied woodpeckers are often victims of European starlings. As many as half of all red-bellied woodpecker nests in some areas get invaded by starlings.

More Information: Cornell Lab of Ornithology “All About Birds”

Red-Bellied Woodpecker

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/13/16

Observation Time: 9:35 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Red-bellied Woodpecker

Scientific Name: Melanerpes carolinus

Comments: Primarily a bird of the southeast, where its rolling calls are familiar sounds in swamps and riverside woods. Omnivorous and adaptable, this woodpecker has also adjusted to life in suburbs and city parks, and in recent years it has been expanding its range to the north. Despite the name, the faint traces of red on the belly are not often visible in the field.

Red-bellied woodpeckers are often victims of European starlings. As many as half of all red-bellied woodpecker nests in some areas get invaded by starlings.

More Information: Cornell Lab of Ornithology “All About Birds”

 

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/8/19

Observation Time: 10:20 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Red-bellied woodpecker

Scientific Name: Melanerpes carolinus

Comments: I kept hearing their distinctive kwirr call in a certain area, so I investigated. When I finally spotted them, I saw they were nesting in a cavity high in a dead tree.

Sharon is at the northern edge of the red-bellied woodpecker’s range. It is a year-round resident.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Deborah Radovsky

Observation Date: 12/3/18

Observation Time: 9:10 a.m.

Observation Location: on trail in woods, near Sharon dog park

Common Name: Red-breasted Nuthatch

Scientific Name: Sitta canadensis

Comments: There have been flocks of these for weeks in these woods, more than I have ever observed over many years, possibly due to plentiful food sources. Note that the population of red-breasted nuthatches is shifting northward, according to the National Audubon Society. See: http://climate.audubon.org/birds/rebnut/red-breasted-nuthatch

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Josh Simons

Observation Date: 2/24/13

Observation Time: 3:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill area

Common Name: Red-breasted Nuthatch

Scientific Name: Sitta canadensis

Comments: Small photo due to heavy cropping.

More Information: All About Birds

Red-Breasted Nuthatch

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/6/18

Observation Time: 6:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Red-breasted Nuthatch

Scientific Name: Sitta canadensis

Comments: This red-breasted nuthatch was visiting the bird feeder.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/29/14

Observation Time: 10:00 a.m.

Observation Location: King Phillip’s Rock trail

Common Name: Red-eyed vireo

Scientific Name: Vireo olivaceus

Comments: Red-eyed vireos sing all day long. Their song sounds like “Here I am. Where are you?” That is fitting, as they are very hard to see in the foliage.

More Information: All About Birds

Red-Eyed Vireo

Red-Eyed Vireo

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/30/20

Observation Time: 1:40 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm (TTOR)

Common Name: Red-eyed Vireo

Scientific Name: Vireo olivaceus

Comments:  Red-eyed vireos are a common summer resident in Sharon. They sing all day long. Since they are notoriously hard to spot in the canopy, the mnemonic for their song is, “Here I am. Where are you?” Hear a recording at: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Red-eyed_Vireo/sounds. Note that all vireo species’ songs have a similar cadence.

More Information: All About Birds

This pair of red-eyed vireos was gathering nesting materials and building a nest:

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/5/16

Observation Time: 10:40 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Red-eyed Vireo

Scientific Name: Vireo olivaceus

Comments: Red-eyed vireos are a common summer resident in Sharon. They sing all day long. Since they are notoriously hard to spot in the canopy, the mnemonic for their song is, “Here I am. Where are you?” Hear a recording at: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Red-eyed_Vireo/sounds

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Richard Kramer

Observation Date: 2/11/19

Observation Time: 10:30 a.m.

Observation Location: west side of Lake Massapoag near the Atlantic White Cedar Swamp

Common Name: Red-shouldered Hawk

Scientific Name: Buteo lineatus

Comments: One of the best ways to find Red-shouldered Hawks is to learn their distinctive whistle. Listen for these birds in and around wet forests, where you may find them hunting from a perch along stream or pond.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Will Sweet

Observation Date: 2/18/09

Observation Time: 11:45 a.m.

Observation Location: Sharon Community Gardens

Common Name: Red-shouldered hawk

Scientific Name: Buteo lineatus

Comments: The hawk was perched in a large dead tree. It flew across the gardens many times spooking robins and starlings.

More Information: Whatbird.com: Red-shouldered Hawk

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 3/9/14

Observation Time: 2:40 p.m.

Observation Location: 4 Gavins Pond Road

Common Name: Red-shouldered hawk

Scientific Name: Buteo lineatus

Comments: As I sat at my desk talking on the phone, this hawk swooped in and landed on a branch outside my window. I grabbed my camera with my free hand and snapped this shot. I got help with the identification from my friend John Baur.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Deb Radovsky

Observation Date: 4/9/18

Observation Time: evening

Observation Location: Cottage and Ames Streets

Common Name: Red-shouldered Hawk

Scientific Name: Buteo lineatus

Comments: Although the American Crow often mobs the Red-shouldered Hawk, sometimes the relationship is not so one-sided. They may chase each other and try to steal food from each other. They may also both attack a Great Horned Owl and join forces to chase the owl out of the hawk’s territory.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Andrea & Herb Daroff

Observation Date: 5/15/08

Observation Time: 11:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Pilgrim Drive

Common Name: Red-shouldered hawk

Scientific Name: Buteo lineatus

Comments: This young hawk settled in a branch not more than 20 feet from our deck. I was able to get a number of shots and since he moved around a bit before flying away, I was able to shoot from different angles. We have seen him again in the yard but never again has he perched so conveniently, so cooperatively or so close.

More Information: Whatbird.com: Red-shouldered Hawk

Red-Shouldered Hawk

Observer: Ilan Fisher

Observation Date: 4/3/19

Observation Time: 2:00 PM

Observation Location: Junction of E. Foxboro St. & Harding St.

Common Name: Red-tailed Hawk

Scientific Name: Buteo jamaicensis

Comments: Red-tails are big, but they only weigh a maximum of about 3 lbs. They can live up to 30 years. They feed predominantly on small mammals.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/11/20

Observation Time: 11:00 a.m.

Observation Location: near high-tension lines across the street from the Gavins Pond soccer fields

Common Name: Red-tailed Hawk

Scientific Name: Buteo jamaicensis

Comments: Red-tails are big, but they only weigh a maximum of about 3 lbs. They can live up to 30 years. They feed predominantly on small mammals.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/2/18

Obseration Time: 8:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Red-tailed hawk

Scientific Name: Buteo jamaicensis

Comments: This red-tail had caught something – either a mouse or a frog. The hawk lost its grip on its prey, which dropped to the ground. The hawk immediately swooped down to the ground to retrieve its prize.

More information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/20/20

Observation Time: 4:26 p.m.

Observation Location: high tension lines opposite Ward’s Berry Farm

Common Name: Red-tailed Hawk

Scientific Name: Buteo jamaicensis

Comments: Red-tailed hawks are often harassed by songbirds. This one was engaged in a dogfight with a redwing blackbird.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 8/14/13

Observation Time: 7:00 a.m.

Observation Location: 4 Gavins Pond Road

Common Name: Red-tailed Hawk (juvenile)

Scientific Name: Buteo jamaicensis

Comments: Red-tails are big, but they only weigh a maximum of about 3 lbs. They can live up to 30 years. They feed predominantly on small mammals.

I took these photos out the kitchen window.

More Information: PBase

Observer: Deborah Radovsky

Observation Date: 12/3/18

Observation time: 9:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Lake Massapoag, swimming very close to shore

Common Name: Red-throated Loon

Scientific Name: Gavia stellata

Comments: Adult, non-breeding plummage. Breeds in the arctic.

More information: Wikipedia

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/18/20

Observation Time: 8:45 a.m.

Observation Location: wetlands under high tension wires across the road from the Gavins Pond soccer fields

Common Name: Red-winged blackbird

Scientific Name: Agelaius phoeniceus

Comments: Red-winged blackbirds are typically found near water. Only the males have bright red epaulets on their wings

More Information: All about Birds

This is a female red-winged blackbird:

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 3/1/11

Observation Time: 5:10 p.m.

Observation Location: near Gavins Pond

Common Name: Redwing blackbird

Scientific Name: Agelaius phoeniceus

Comments: First redwing I’ve seen this season. The ground is blanketed in old snow and the pond is still frozen solid. In fall and winter they eat weedy seeds such as ragweed and cocklebur as well as native sunflowers and waste grains.

More Information: All about Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/15/14

Observation Time: 5:10 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Road

Common Name: Redwing blackbird

Scientific Name: Agelaius phoeniceus

Comments: Redwing blackbirds are typically found near water.

More Information: All about Birds

Redwing Blackbird

Redwing Blackbird

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 3/19/09

Observation Time: 4:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavin’s Pond

Common Name: Ring-necked Duck

Scientific Name: Aythya collaris

Comments: I saw ring-necked ducks last spring at Gavins Pond. They must use Gavins Pond to rest and feed during their migration.

More Information: All About Birds: Ring-necked Duck

Ring-Necked Duck

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 3/25/11

Observation Time: 5:20 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavin’s Pond

Common Name: Ring-necked Duck

Scientific Name: Aythya collaris

Comments: Ring-necked ducks migrate through Sharon, and can be seen in spring and fall.

More Information: All About Birds: Ring-necked Duck

Ring-Necked Duck

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 4/18/13

Observation Time: 2:20 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavin’s Pond

Common Name: Ring-necked Duck

Scientific Name: Aythya collaris

Comments: Ring-necked ducks migrate through Sharon, and can be seen in spring and fall.

More Information: All About Birds: Ring-necked Duck

Observer: Deb Radovsky

Observation Date:

Observation Time:

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Rose-breated Grosbeak

Scientific Name: Pheucticus ludovicianus

Comments: Look for these birds in forest edges and woodlands. Listen, too, for their distinctive voices. They sound like American Robins, but with an extra sweetness. They also make a sharp chink like the squeak of a sneaker.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/12/16

Observation Time: 6:40 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Center

Common Name: Rose-breasted Grosbeak

Scientific Name: Pheucticus ludovicianus

Comments: Look for these birds in forest edges and woodlands. Listen, too, for their distinctive voices. They sound like American Robins, but listen for an extra sweetness, as if the bird had operatic training; they also make a sharp chink like the squeak of a sneaker. 

More Information: All About Birds

rose-breasted grosbeak-2

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/23/16

Observation Time: 7:50 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Rose-breasted Grosbeak

Scientific Name: Pheucticus ludovicianus

Comments: The male rose-breasted grosbeak is one of our more photogenic songbirds, especially on a sunny morning. The female is drab brown.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/2/14

Observation Time: 11:50 a.m.

Observation Location: in the woods near Gavins Pond

Common Name: Rose-breasted Grosbeak

Scientific Name: Pheucticus ludovicianus

Comments: I found this specimen by listening to its call.

More Information: All About Birds

Observer: Josh Simons

Observation Date: 6/25/11

Observation Time: 1:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill area

Common Name: Rose-breasted Grosbeak

Scientific Name: Pheucticus ludovicianus

Comments: A female just after a bath.

More Information: All About Birds

Rose-Breasted Grosbeak

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