Sightings – Mammal

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 11/12/12

Observation Time: 5:30 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Dam

Common Name: Big Brown Bat

Scientific Name: Eptesicus fuscus

Comments: New England has little brown bats and big brown bats. Little brown bats are only found in New England in summer. Since these bats were observed in mid-November, they are presumably big brown bats. Bats fly fast, so getting these photos was not easy!

More Information: Mass Audubon

Big Brown Bat

Big Brown Bat

 

Observer: Marla Lonergan

Observation Date: 6/11/14

Observation Time: 6:00 p.m.

Observation Location: 5 Tisdale Road

Common Name: Bobcat

Scientific Name: Lynx rufus

Comments: Second bobcat sighting in Sharon in less than a week. See the NECN
report
.

More Information: Wikipedia

Bobcat

 

Observer: Suzy Levenson

Observation Date: 6/7/14

Observation Time: 8:15 a.m.

Observation Location: 155 Billings St

Common Name: Bobcat

Scientific Name: Lynx rufus

Comments: The bobcat was calmly sitting in my backyard looking at my housecat who was sitting in a window. There were three snapping turtles in the backyard at the same time. Then the bobcat quietly walked away into the woods.

More Information: Wikipedia

Bobcat

 

Observer: Kirk Thomas

Observation Date: 3/3/13

Observation Time: 6:20 a.m.

Observation Location: Griffin Land

Common Name: Coyote

Scientific Name: Canis latrans

More Information: Nature Works

Observer: Brittaney Dunham

Observation Date: 5/1/14

Observation Time: 11:00 a.m.

Observation Location: 16 High Plain St., Sharon

Common Name: Coyote

Scientific Name: Canis latrans

Comments: This bold coyote comes into our back yard pretty regularly. As a result, our dog yard has an 8-foot fence.

More Information: Nature Works

Coyote

Observer: Alison Siegel

Observation Date: 5/20/09

Observation Time: 7:05 a.m.

Observation Location: Lakeview Street

Common Name: Coyote

Scientific Name: Canis latrans

Comments: At 7 AM on the mornings of 5/20 and 5/21 a single coyote was observed walking in our backyard.

More Information: Nature Works

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 11/26/08

Observation Time: 2:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Bluebird house in field near Gavins Pond Road

Common Name: Deer Mouse

Scientific Name: Peromyscus maniculatus

Comments: Deer mice sometimes take up residence in bird houses. They can live up to five years in captivity but probably only live about a year in the wild. This shorter natural life span is primarily due to the very large number of predators that take and consume deer mice. These predators include foxes, coyotes, snakes, owls, hawks, and many other species of birds. In the absence of these predators, deer mice populations can become explosively large leading to serious environmental damage and degradation.

More Information: Animal Diversity Web

Deer Mouse

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/14/16

Observation Time: 8:45 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Eastern chipmunk

Scientific Name: Tamias striatus

Comments: The common name originally may have been spelled “chitmunk,” from the native Odawa (Ottawa) word jidmoonh, meaning “red squirrel” (cf. Ojibwe, ajidamoo). The earliest form cited in the Oxford English Dictionary (from 1842) is “chipmonk,” however, “chipmunk” appears in several books from the 1820s and 1830s. Other early forms include “chipmuck” and “chipminck,” and in the 1830s they were also referred to as “chip squirrels;” probably in reference to the sound they make. In the mid-1800s, John James Audubon and his sons included a lithograph of the chipmunk in their Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America, calling it the “chipping squirrel [or] hackee.” Chipmunks have also been referred to as “striped squirrels,” “timber tigers,” and “ground squirrels” (although the name “ground squirrel” usually refers to other squirrels, such as those of the genus Spermophilus). – Wikipedia

More Information: Animal Diversity Web: Eastern Chipmunk

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/26/10

Observation Time: 5:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond

Common Name: Eastern Chipmunk

Scientific Name: Tamias striatus

More Information: Animal Diversity Web: Eastern Chipmunk

Eastern Chipmunk

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/8/19

Observation Time: 8:50 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Eastern Chipmunk

Scientific Name: Tamias striatus

Comments: This chipmunk was using gaps in a stone wall to hide from predators such as hawks. It would not come out until I moved away.

More Information: Wikipedia

Observer: Peter Higgins

Observation Date: 6/8/08

Observation Time: 6:15 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm

Common Name: Eastern Chipmunk

Scientific Name: Tamias striatus

More Information: Animal Diversity Web: Eastern Chipmunk

Chipmunk

 

Observer: Josh Simons

Observation Date: 7/17/11

Observation Time: 4:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill area

Common Name: Eastern chipmunk

Scientific Name: Tamias striatus

More Information: Animal Diversity Web: Eastern Chipmunk

Eastern Chipmunk

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/27/13

Observation Time: 1:50 p.m.

Observation Location: Sharon train station

Common Name: Eastern Cottontail rabbit

Scientific Name: Sylvilagus floridanus

Comments: The Eastern Cottontail is an introduced species that is now common in Sharon. Much rarer is the native New England Cottontail, which is smaller and has shorter ears and a black spot on its forehead. If is very hard to tell these two species apart without DNA testing.

More Information: NewEnglandCottontail.org

Observer: Josh Simons

Observation Date: 1/24/2016

Observation Time: 4:30 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Parkway

Common Name: Eastern Coyote

Scientific Name: Canis latrans

Comments: The eastern coyote is part coyote, part wolf, and part domestic dog. They howl like wolves and yip like coyotes and can hunt in both open field areas and forests.

More Information: Wikipedia

Observer: Josh Simons

Observation Date: 6/13/13

Observation Time: 9:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill area

Common Name: Eastern Gray Squirrel (black melanistic)

Scientific Name: Sciurus carolinensis

Comments: A member of the black melanistic sub-group of the eastern gray squirrel.

More Information: Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History

Eastern Grey Squirrel

Observer: Michael Tranavitch

Observation Date: 2/13/09

Observation Time: 2:45 p.m.

Observation Location: Pine Street, Sharon

Common Name: Fisher

Scientific Name: Martes pennanti

Comments: Appeared in backyard near deck. The fisher is the second largest member of the weasel family found in Massachusetts; only the river otter is larger. Although many people call them “fisher cats,” the name is inappropriate. They are neither members of the feline family, nor do they catch fish.

More Information: MassAudubon.org or Wild Things Unlimited

Fisher

Observer: Faith Berkland

Observation Date: 3/16/18

Observation Time: 8:00 a.m.

Observation Location: 302 Mansfield Street

Common Name: Fisher

Scientific Name: Martes pennanti

Comments: Heading south across my front yard. About 4′ long including the tail. Rich brown color, tail darker toward the end. Sorry, no photo.

More Information: Mass Audubon

Observer: Kate Kavanagh

Observation Date: 9/23/10

Observation Time: 7:15 a.m.

Observation Location: Woods at the end of South Pleasant St.

Common Name: Fisher

Scientific Name: Martes pennanti

Comments: Not too far from the neighborhood houses, moving quickly through the woods along the trail path.

More Information: MassAudubon.org or Wild Things Unlimited

Observer: Art Newman

Observation Date: 11/4/11

Observation Time: 9:12 a.m.

Observation Location:

Common Name: Gray Fox

Scientific Name: Urocyon cinereoargenteus

Comments: Spotted running across Billings St., headed for the Devil’s Rock trail. Coat in transition with yellowish flecks on her body.

The gray fox has pointed ears, a pointed muzzle and long hooked claws. The gray fox can climb and will occasionally forage for food or rest in a tree. The gray fox’s ability to climb trees is shared only with the Asian raccoon dog among canids.

More Information: Nature Works

Gray Fox

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/12/12

Observation Time: 8:30 a.m.

Observation Location: 5 Gavins Pond Rd.

Common Name: Gray Fox

Scientific Name: Urocyon cinereoargenteus

Gray Fox

Comments: This species and the closely related Channel Island fox (Urocyon littoralis) are the only living members of the genus Urocyon, which is considered to be among the most primitive of the living canids. The gray fox’s ability to climb trees is shared only with the Asian raccoon dog among canids.

Though it was once the most common fox in the east, and still is found there, human advancement allowed the adaptable red fox to become more prevalent.

More Information: Wikipedia

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/24/10

Observation Time: 8:20 p.m.

Observation Location: 4 Gavins Pond Road

Common Name: Gray Fox

Scientific Name: Urocyon cinereoargenteus

Comments: I saw a small, gray-colored fox with a huge bushy tail at dusk (no photo opportunity).

More Information: Wikipedia

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 4/4/11

Observation Time: 1:15 p.m.

Observation Location: 4 Gavins Pond Road

Common Name: Groundhog

Scientific Name: Marmota monax

Comments: This individual probably just emerged from hibernation.

More Information: Mass Audubon Society

Groundhog

Observer: John Wraga

Observation Date: 3/2/14

Observation Time: 2:45 p.m.

Observation Location: Traphole Brook at High Plain St.

Common Name: Mink

Scientific Name: Neovison vison

Comments: Mink are semi-aquatic. They eat crayfish, small frogs and fish, along with small mammals such as shrews, rabbits, mice, and muskrats. They also prey on ducks and other water fowl.

This mink was hit and killed by a vehicle as it crossed the road by Traphole Brook.

More Information: Wikipedia

Mink

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/8/13

Observation Time: 6:08 p.m.

Observation Location: Beaver Brook near tennis courts

Common Name: Muskrat

Scientific Name: Ondatra zibethicus

Comments: Muskrats are fairly common near water in Sharon. They are native to North America, and related to voles and lemmings, but they are in a different genus from true rats.

More Information: Wikipedia

Muskrat

Muskrat

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 9/30/12

Observation Time: 6:05 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond area

Common Name: Northern Short-tailed Shrew

Scientific Name: Blarina brevicauda

Comments: This venomous mammal is a highly active insectivore that consumes up to three times its weight daily. I don’t know why this specimen died.

More Information: Wikipedia

Northern Short-Tailed Shrew

Observer: Richard Mandell

Observation Date: 10/12/10

Observation Time: dusk

Observation Location: Mountain St.

Common Name: Opossum

Scientific Name: Didelphimorphia

Comments: Opossums are voracious eaters that will try anything they find. Surprisingly, opossums eat ticks by the thousands. Ticks, particularly the black-legged ticks like deer ticks that are responsible for the spread of Lyme disease, appear to be a top item on the opossum’s menu. Several years ago, biologists put opossums and other species, like chipmunks, squirrels, mice, and catbirds to the test, giving each animal 100 ticks to eat. Opossums ate far more ticks than any other animal, leading scientists to estimate that just one opossum eats, on average, 5,000 ticks each year.

More Information: The National Opossum Society

Opossum

Opossum

Observer: Rebecca Hickman

Observation Date: 7/17/12

Observation Time: n/a

Observation Location: Back yard

Common Name: Rabbit, Hawk, and Turkeys

Scientific Name: n/a

Comments: This past week, beginning last weekend, has been like watching an episode of National Geograhpic in my back yard. I’m exaggerating, but not by much..

I enjoy watching the little bunny that has taken up residency under our shed in our back yard.. I’m outside a lot, and I see him munching clover all the time.

Sunday morning I was outside having my morning cup of joe, and watching the bunny hop around on the freshly mowed lawn. Just then, what I’m assuming was a hawk came and snatched him. It happened so suddenly! At first I gasped and weakly yelled “no!” as the big bird of prey flew off with the fluffy guy. The area beyond our back yard is heavily wooded, and the trees are very tall so much of the aerial view is obscured by them and I didn’t see much more. I would have known it was a hawk with more certainty if I saw it flying more. My only good view of him was by the back of his wings when he came down, and took off. It was sad to see the bunny go, but mostly it was an amazing thing to see and I’m glad I got too see such a moment in person.

Then, yesterday I went outside to grill some hot dogs and there were two big turkeys in the yard. I grabbed my toddler and brought him out for a peek, but I knew to stay close to the safety of the door. I know from past experience that turkeys can be aggressive. The experience was when my curiousity brought me close to a pack of turkeys while I was driving in Scituate. The turkeys charged and gobble- gobbled and attacked the tires of our mini van. I was so startled that I told my husband to lock the doors. I started laughing at the silliness of my reaction, but when I saw that he actually DID lock his door, I laughed even more.

Observer: Rick Dumont

Observation Date: 5/21/09

Observation Time: 9:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Belcher St.

Common Name: Raccoon

Scientific Name: Procyon lotor

Comments: The raccoon is mostly nocturnal. It is also solitary, except for mothers and their young. In the winter the raccoon may sleep in its den for a few weeks but it does not hibernate. The raccoons usually walks, but it can run at speeds of up to 15 miles an hour. It is also a good swimmer and often hunts for food in the water. The raccoon makes a variety of vocalizations including hisses, whistles, screams, growls and snarls.

More Information: Nature Works

Raccoon

Observer: Richard Mandell

Observation Date: 8/20/2016

Observation Time: 2:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Mountain Street

Common Name: Raccoon

Scientific Name: Procyon lotor

Comments: Unusual to see out during the day, as raccoons are mainly nocturnal. Probably looking for the bird feeders, which I now take in at night since raccoons plundered them at night. Check out the nighttime photo I took of a raccoon trying to get sugar water from our hummingbird feeder. It’s posted at this site.

More Information: National Geographic

 

Observer: Richard Mandell

Observation Date: 6/23/16

Observation Time: 2:04 a.m.

Observation Location: 580 Mountain Street (Back Deck)

Common Name: Raccoon

Scientific Name: Procyon lotor

Comments: This explains why the hummingbirds seemed so thirsty that the feeder was emptying every night.

More Information: Living with Wildlife

Racoon

Observer: Alison Siegel

Observation Date: 1/5/10

Observation Time: 6:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Lakeview St.

Common Name: Red Fox

Scientific Name: Vulpes vulpes

Comments: A fox was spotted running on the frozen lake early in the morning.

More Information: Animal Diversity Web

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 10/16/12

Observation Time: 8:55 a.m.

Observation Location: 4 Gavins Pond Road (back yard)

Common Name: Red Fox

Scientific Name: Vulpes vulpes

Comments: This red fox showed up in our back yard. I took these photos out the window. Apart from its large size, the red fox is distinguished from other fox species by its ability to adapt quickly to new environments and, unlike most of its related species, is not listed as endangered anywhere.

More Information: Animal Diversity Web

Red Fox

Red Fox

Red Fox

Observer: Alison Siegel

Observation Date: 3/3/10

Observation Time: 7:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Lakeview St.

Common Name: Red Fox

Scientific Name: Vulpes vulpes

Comments: My sons and I were finishing breakfast and saw a fox walk across our backyard, close to Lake Massapoag.

More Information: Animal Diversity Web

Observer: Alison Siegel

Observation Date: 4/13/10

Observation Time: 6:00 a.m.

Observation Location: backyard

Common Name: Red Fox

Scientific Name: Vulpes vulpes

Comments: Fox was spotted walking across our backyard, close to Lake Massapoag.

More Information: Animal Diversity Web

Observer: Faith Berkland

Observation Date: 4/14/18

Observation Location: 302 Mansfield Street, Sharon, MA

Common Name: Red fox

Scientific Name: Vulpes vulpes

Red Fox Faces Fresh Red Fox Face

Observer: Alison Siegel

Observation Date: 4/17/10

Observation Time: 9:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Lake Massapoag and Lakeview St

Common Name: Red Fox

Scientific Name: Vulpes vulpes

Comments: A fox was spotted walking from the Massapoag Yacht Club into our backyard. It proceeded across our back lawn to our neighbor’s yard, and then it returned to our sideyard, walked up our front driveway toward Lakeview St, eventually returning in the direction of the boat club.

More Information: Animal Diversity Web

Observer: Andrea & Herb Daroff

Observation Date: 7/4/10

Observation Time: 5:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Pilgrim Drive

Common Name: Red Fox

Scientific Name: Vulpes vulpes

Comments: The fox was within 10 feet of our house. It spent a good 10 minutes sniffing around (looking for bugs maybe?) This was not the first time we have seen a fox in our yard but this is the first time we have seen it hanging around so close to the house and for long enough for us to be able to grab a camera. Unfortunately, we had to photograph through a window screen so the picture isn’t as sharp as it should be.

More Information: Animal Diversity Web

Red Fox

Observer: Ilan Fisher

Observation Date: 2005

Observation Location: Back yard

Common Name: Red Foxes

Scientific Name: Vulpes vulpes

Comments: My wife saw the mom walking in our back yard. A few days later, I saw one of the babies standing beside my swimming pool. I thought it was a strange looking cat; and then I thought, dog; and then I thought, fox. He scooted under the stockade fence. I climbed up and saw that it was living under my neighbor’s shed. I tried to get a photograph but it was too far away for any lens I had.

In the end, I set up a ladder, sat on top – checked on and off for a few days – with my video camera; and then I saw them. I had to use digital zoom to get these shots, that’s why there is so much camera shake. That was the last I saw of them. I suppose the mother moved them every few days. And what’s that they were eating? Well, not my cat – probably somebody’s.

Youtube video: UpTown Foxes – Sharon, MA 

Observer: Ellenor Yahrmarkt

Observation Date: 5/11/09

Observation Location: Borderland State Park

Common Name: Red Fox

Scientific Name: Vulpes vulpes

Comments: Fox kits in a den under a foundation

More Information: Wikipedia: Red Fox & National Geographic

Foxes

Observer: Josh Simons

Observation Date: 11/28/08

Observation Time: 10:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Parkway

Common Name: Red Squirrel

Scientific Name: Tamiasciurus hudsonicus

Comments: The red squirrel is known to “tap” maple trees. It bites the bark until sap flows out, and returns later for a sweet treat after the water in the sap has evaporated.

More Information: http://www.nhptv.org/Natureworks/Redsquirrel.htm

Red Squirrel

Observer: Josh Simons

Observation Date: 3/9/11

Observation Time: 8:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill area

Common Name: Red Squirrel

Scientific Name: Tamiasciurus hudsonicus

More Information: http://www.nhptv.org/Natureworks/Redsquirrel.htm

American Red Squirrel

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 4/26/13

Observation Time: 4:20 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Red Squirrel

Scientific Name: Tamiasciurus hudsonicus

Comments: American red squirrels experience severe early mortality (on average only 22% survive to one year of age). The survival probability, however, increases to age three, when it begins to decrease again. Females that survive to one year of age have a life expectancy of 2.3 years and a maximum lifespan of eight years.

More Information: Wikipedia

Red Squirrel

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/8/19

Observation Time: 7:50 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Red Squirrel

Scientific Name: Tamiasciurus hudsonicus

Comments: Red squirrels can be easily distinguished from other North American tree squirrels by their smaller size, territorial behavior, and reddish fur with a white underbelly). Red squirrels are somewhat larger than chipmunks.

More Information: Wikipedia

Observer: Pat Gardner

Observation Date: 11/11/12

Observation Time: 6:15 a.m.

Observation Location: Shepard’s Pond, Canton

Common Name: River Otter

Scientific Name: Lontra canadensis

Comments: This morning there was only one, but over the past 2 months there’ve been 2. Shepard’s Pond is on the Canton-Sharon border.

More Information: Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife

Observer: Sue Price

Observation Date: 2/15/13

Observation Time: 7:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Bay Road near Wilshire (going from Sharon to Stoughton)

Common Name: River Otter

Scientific Name: Lontra canadensis

Comments: I think it was a river otter. It was very dark with a long fat tail and moved very quickly – don’t think it was a beaver as it had a long thin body.

More Information: Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife

Observer: Joe Macri

Observation Date: 3/3/14

Observation Time: 5:30 p.m.

Observation Location: High Plain St. approx. 200 yards from intersection with Norwood St.

Common Name: River Otter

Scientific Name: Lontra canadensis

Comments: Just at sunset, I observed a large, sinuous animal crossing the road. I only saw it briefly and in silhouette, but was surprised by the size of it. When looking online I narrowed it down to River Otter or Fisher Cat. I’m 99% sure it was a River Otter, though.

More Information: National Geographic

Observer: Sean Kent

Observation Date: Week of 2/2/18 to 2/9/18

Observation Location: Trowelshop Pond in Sharon

Common Name: River Otter

Scientific Name: Lontra canadensis

Comments: At the beginning of February, three otters have been quite visible during the day at Trowel Shop Pond in Sharon.

More Information: The Otters of Trowelshop Pond

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 4/16/11

Observation Time: 7:35 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Road behind Shaw’s Plaza

Common Name: Short-tailed weasel

Scientific Name: Mustela erminea

Comments: White undersides (as opposed to cream-colored), white feet, and small size differentiate this road-kill specimen from a long-tailed weasel. Mink are all brown. Short-tailed weasel is also known as a stoat. In winter, they turn all white with a black-tipped tail, and are called ermine.

More Information: FactZoo

Short-tailed Weasel

Observer: Josh Simons

Observation Date: 5/8/04

Observation Time: 8:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Parkway

Common Name: White Squirrel (leucistic variation of the Eastern Gray Squirrel)

Scientific Name: Sciurus carolinensis

Comments: There are several different reasons why Eastern Gray Squirrels sometimes are sometimes white. Check out this video: http://www.untamedscience.com/biodiversity/white-squirrel/

More Information: White Squirrel Research Institute and Jamaica Pond’s Albino Gray Squirrel

White Squirrel

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 4/12/14

Observation Time: 2:00 p.m.

Observation Location: 4 Gavins Pond Road (back yard)

Common Name: White-footed mouse

Scientific Name: Peromyscus leucopus

Comments: This juvenile mouse was in our garden.

More Information: Wikipedia

White-footed Mouse

Observer: Peter Higgins

Observation Date: 11/26/08 & 11/30/08

Observation Time: 7:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm

Common Name: White-Tailed Deer

Scientific Name: Odocoileus virginianus

Comments: Moose Hill Farm is a wonderful gift to the town, I get up early and see deer, turkeys, and coyotes on a regular basis.

More Information: University of Michigan Museum of Zoology “Animal Diversity Web”

White-Tailed Deer

White-Tailed Deer

White-Tailed Deer

Observer: Deb Radovsky

Observation Date: 5/2/18

Observation Time: 6:20 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon, Billings Loop

Common Name: White-tailed Deer

Scientific Name: Odocoileus virginianus

Comments: Adult white-tails have reddish-brown coats in summer which fade to a duller grayish-brown in winter. Male deer, called bucks, are easily recognizable in the summer and fall by their prominent set of antlers, which are grown annually and fall off in the winter. Only the bucks grow antlers, which bear a number of tines, or sharp points. During the mating season, also called the rut, bucks fight over territory by using their antlers in sparring matches.

More Information: National Geographic

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/7/19

Observation Time: 7:55 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: White-tailed Deer

Scientific Name: Odocoileus virginianus

Comments: White-tailed deer are common in Sharon due to the absence of top predators such as wolves and cougars. If the deer population becomes too high, they will starve. Exclosures have been erected in the woods at the Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary to assess the impact of deer browsing. The photo below shows lush green vegetation growing inside the exclosure where the deer cannot get at it.

More Information: Wikipedia

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/12/10

Observation Time: 7:40 a.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Road soccer field

Common Name: White-Tailed Deer

Scientific Name: Odocoileus virginianus

Comments: This doe was grazing on the green grass at the soccer field.

More Information: University of Michigan Museum of Zoology “Animal Diversity Web”

Whitetail Deer