Sightings – Butterflies & Moths

Observer: Faith Berkland

Observation Date: 9/22/15

Observation Time: 3:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Mansfield Street

Common Name: Brown-hooded Owlet Moth caterpillar

Scientific Name: Cucullia convexipennis

Comments: The moth flies from May to September depending on the location. The caterpillars feed on Aster, Solidago and Callistephus chinensis.

More Information: Wikipedia

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/9/11

Observation Time: 3:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Field near Gavins Pond

Common Name: Buckeye Butterfly

Scientific Name: Junonia coenia

Comments: This bedraggled specimen is showing a lot of wear and tear on its wings.

More Information: Wikipedia

Buckeye Butterfly

Buckeye Butterfly

 

Observer: Rita Corey

Observation Date: 8/13/20

Observation Time: 3:45 p.m.

Observation Place: Mountain St.

Common Name: Cecropia Moth (coccoon phase)

Scientific Name: Hyalophora cecropia

Comments: The cecropia moth is the largest North American moth. It has a wingspan of 5-6 inches. It is a very colorful moth.

The female cecropia moth lays rows of eggs on both sides of a leaf on a tree or shrub. The eggs hatch in 10-14 days and the caterpillars begin eating the host tree or shrub’s leaves. The cecropia cocoon is crescent shaped. There is one generation of cecropia born each year.

After emerging from the coccoon, the mature cecropia moth does not eat. It’s only purpose it to mate. It only lives for a few weeks. Despite its dramatic size and bright coloration, it is seldom seen because it is nocturnal.

More Information: Nature Works

Three cecropia moth coccoons:

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 8/30/11

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Road by soccer field parking lot

Common Name: Clouded Sulphur butterfly

Scientific Name: Colias philodice

Comments: This butterfly was hard to photograph because it would not hold still! Note the big green eyes and the spots on the wing.

More Information: Wisconsin Butterflies

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 9/4/20

Observation Time: 1:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm (TTOR)

Common Name: Clouded Sulphur butterfly

Scientific Name: Colias philodice

Comments: A common butterfly seen from late April to mid-October. This patch of blooming Joe Pye weed was alive with clouded sulphurs feeding on the nectar. Note the big green eyes.

More Information: Massachusetts Butterfly Club

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/2/11

Observation Time: 2:45 p.m.

Observation Location: Soccer field parking lot off Gavins Pond Road

Common Name: Clover Looper Moth

Scientific Name: Caenurgina crassiuscula

Comments: This moth stopped to rest on the soccer field parking lot, allowing me to get close enough for this shot. I got the ID from bugguide.net.

More Information: A Prairie Haven

Clover Looper Moth

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 9/22/11

Observation Time: 3:05 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Dam

Common Name: Cobbler moth

Scientific Name: Condica sutor

Comments: There are over 10,000 species of moths in North America. Identifying them can be a challenge, but there are some good online resources such as the Bug Guide.

More Information: Bug Guide

Cobbler Moth

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/27/19

Observation Time: 12:45 p.m.

Observation Location: Conservation land near Morse & Lakeview

Common Name: Common Ringlet butterfly

Scientific Name: Coenonympha tullia

Comments:  Ringlets can be found in a variety of grassy habitats, including roadsides, woodland edges and clearings, prairies, bogs, and arctic and alpine taiga and tundra. It is an erratic flyer. It is a holarctic species found in northern Europe and Asia and across North America.

More Information: Wikipedia

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/2/11

Observation Time: 1:30 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Road near soccer field parking lot

Common Name: Common Ringlet butterfly

Scientific Name: Coenonympha tullia

Comments:  Ringlets can be found in a variety of grassy habitats, including roadsides, woodland edges and clearings, prairies, bogs, and arctic and alpine taiga and tundra. It is a poor flyer, but can sometimes be found along ditches seeking new grounds. It is a holarctic species found in northern Europe and Asia and across North America.

More Information: Wikipedia

Common Ringlet Butterfly

Common Ringlet Butterfly

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/9/20

Observation Time: 3:00 p.m.

Observation Location: meadow near Gavins Pond dam

Common Name: Common Ringlet butterfly

Scientific Name: Coenonympha tullia

Comments:  Ringlets can be found in a variety of grassy habitats, including roadsides, woodland edges and clearings, prairies, bogs, and arctic and alpine taiga and tundra. It is an erratic flyer. It is a holarctic species found in northern Europe and Asia and across North America.

More Information: Wikipedia