Sightings – Plants

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/12/11

Observation Time: 6:50 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon boardwalk

Common Name: Tussock Sedge

Scientific Name: Carex stricta

Comments: A clumping, upright sedge with narrow, yellowish green leaves. Reddish brown flowers bloom early summer. Prefers moist fertile soil but will tolerate dry or wet sites.

More Information: North Creek Nurseries

Tussock Sedge

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/8/19

Observation Time: 8:15 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon boardwalk

Common Name: Tussock Sedge

Scientific Name: Carex stricta

Comments: A clumping, upright sedge with narrow, yellowish green leaves. Reddish brown flowers bloom early summer. Prefers moist fertile soil but will tolerate dry or wet sites.

More Information: North Creek Nurseries

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/30/10

Observation Time: 4:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Violet toothed polypore

Scientific Name: Trichaptum biforme

Comments: Tree fungus growing on a dead tree. The specimens in this photo are past their prime. Younger specimens exhibit a violet fringe that gives this fungus its name. See http://www.flickr.com/photos/ophis/3067412819/

More Information: InsectImages

Violet toothed polypore

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 8/23/15

Observation Time: 5:45 p.m.

Observation Location: bank of Hammershop Pond at Ames and Cottage Streets.

Common Name: Virginia Marsh-St. John’s wort

Scientific Name: Triadenum virginicum

Comments: Occurs only in wetlands. (Wetland indicator code: OBL).

Please do not dig up wildflowers!

More Information: Go Botany

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 9/9/12

Observation Time: 3:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Sandy Ridge Circle

Common Name: Viscid Violet Cort mushroom

Scientific Name: Cortinarius iodes

Comments: This striking violet mushroom has a watery sheen.

More Information: American Mushrooms

Viscid Violet Cort Mushroom

Viscid Violet Cort Mushroom

Viscid Violet Cort Mushroom

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/6/11

Observation Time: 1:15 p.m.

Observation Location: bank of Beaver Brook (near tennis courts)

Common Name: Water Forget-Me-Not

Scientific Name: Myosotis scorpioides

Comments: Water forget-me-nots are usually found in damp or wet habitats, such as bogs, ponds, streams, ditches, fen and rivers. While it favors wet ground, it can survive submerged in water, and often can form floating rafts.

More Information: Wikipedia

Water Forget-Me-Not

Water Forget-Me-Not

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 9/12/09

Observation Time: 11:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond (near the dam)

Common Name: Water Lily

Scientific Name: Nymphaea odorata

Comments: It usually flowers only from early morning until noon. The black specks in the first photo might be black aphids.

More Information: The University of Texas at Austin

Water Lily

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/13/13

Observation Time: 11:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond

Common Name: Water Shield

Scientific Name: Brasenia schreberi

Comments: Leaf floats like a water lily, but the stem is attached in middle.

More Information: USDA Forest Service

Water Shield

Water Shield

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 8/24/09

Observation Time: 12:30 p.m.

Observation Location: Margin of wetland behind Hunter’s Ridge

Common Name: White Baneberry (a.k.a. “Doll’s Eyes”)

Scientific Name: Actaea pachypoda

Comments: Needs continuously damp soil. Seeds, which are highly toxic, were once used as eyes for rag dolls.

More Information: Dave’s Garden

White Baneberry

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 9/9/12

Observation Time: 3:15 p.m.

Observation Location: Sandy Ridge Circle

Common Name: White Baneberry, or Doll’s Eyes

Scientific Name: Actaea pachypoda

Comments: Both the berries and the entire plant are considered poisonous to humans. The berries contain cardiogenic toxins which can have an immediate sedative effect on human cardiac muscle tissue, and are the most poisonous part of the plant. Ingestion of the berries can lead to cardiac arrest and death.

The berries are harmless to birds, the plant’s primary seed dispersers.

More Information: Wikipedia

White Baneberry

White Baneberry

Observer: Deborah  Radovsky

Observation Date: 11/10/17

Observation time:  unknown

Observation Location: Moose Hill, Vernal Pool Trail

Common Name: White Pine

Scientific Name: Pinus strobus

Comments: White pines are very common in Sharon.

More Information: Wikipedia


Observer: Deborah Radovsky  

Observation Date: 12/20/18

Observation Time: early morning

Observation Location: Conservation trail near the lake (dog park trail)

Common Name: White Pine

Scientific Name: Pinus strobus

Comments: White pines can live over 500 years and grow to more than 150 feet tall.

More Information: Wikipedia

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Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 8/18/20

Observation Time: 11:50 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm (formerly the Kendall Estate)

Common Name: White Vervain

Scientific Name: Verbena urticifolia

Comments: I initially identified this plant using a cool app called Seek. Normally white vervain has green leaves, so I sent my photo of this red-leaved specimen to a botanist, who verified that it is indeed white vervain.

The name vervain is derived from the Celtic ferfaen, that is from fer (to drive away) and from faen (a stone). In early times the plant was used for afflictions of the bladder, such as kidney stones. The species name, urticifolia, means it has nettle-like leaves.

More Information: Friends of the Wildflower Garden

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 10/6/19

Observation Time: 2:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Near Beaver Brook

Common Name: White Wood Aster

Scientific Name: Eurybia divaricata

Comments: Eurybia divaricata is native to Eastern U.S. and typically grows in the wild in dry open woods. It grows in loose clumps with dark, sprawling, sometimes zigzag stems up to 2.5′ tall. Distinctive leaves are heart-shaped, stalked and coarsely toothed. Small but abundant flowers (to 1 inch across) have white rays and yellow to red center disks and appear in flat-topped, terminal clusters in late summer to early fall. Attractive to butterflies.

More information: Missouri Botanical Gardens

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/14/09

Observation Time: 11:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm, Trustees of Reservations land

Common Name: Whorled Loosestrife

Scientific Name: Lysimachia quadrifolia

More Information: Wild Flowers of Sleepy Hollow Lake

Whorled Loosestrife

3 Whorls:

Whorled Loosestrife

4 Whorls:

Whorled Loosestrife

5 Whorls:

Whorled Loosestrife

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 9/4/20

Observation Time: 1:10 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm (in the woods)

Common Name: Whorled Wood Aster

Scientific Name: Oclemena acuminata

Comments: Whorled Wood Asters are among the relatively few woodland wildflowers that bloom in late summer and early fall.

Note the pure gold-green sweat bee feeding on the blossoms.

More information: Wildflowers of the Adirondacks

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/21/16

Observation Time: 3:20 p.m.

Observation Location: Kendall Estate, Moose Hill Street

Common Name: Wild geranium

Scientific Name: Geranium maculatum

Comments: Geranium maculatum, the wild geranium, spotted geranium, or wood geranium, is a perennial plant native to woodlands of eastern North America, from southern Manitoba and southwestern Quebec south to Alabama and Georgia and west to Oklahoma and South Dakota.

More Information: Wikipedia

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/23/18

Observation Time: 9:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Wild geranium

Scientific Name: Geranium maculatum

Comments: Geranium maculatum, the wild geranium, spotted geranium, or wood geranium, is a perennial plant native to woodlands of eastern North America, from southern Manitoba and southwestern Quebec south to Alabama and Georgia and west to Oklahoma and South Dakota.

More Information: Wikipedia

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/26/19

Observation Time: 2:45 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm (formerly the Kendall Estate)

Common Name: Wild geranium

Scientific Name: Geranium maculatum

Comments: Geranium maculatum, the wild geranium, spotted geranium, or wood geranium, is a perennial plant native to woodlands of eastern North America.

More Information: USDA Forest Service

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/5/11

Observation Time: 3:20 p.m.

Observation Location: Kendall Estate, Moose Hill Street

Common Name: Wild geranium

Scientific Name: Geranium maculatum

Comments: Geranium maculatum, the wild geranium, spotted geranium, or wood geranium, is a perennial plant native to woodlands of eastern North America, from southern Manitoba and southwestern Quebec south to Alabama and Georgia and west to Oklahoma and South Dakota.

More Information: Wikipedia

Wild Geranium

Wild Geranium

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 9/7/20

Observation Time: 5:30 p.m.

Observation Location: Conservation land at Morse & Lakeview

Common Name: Wild Grapes

Scientific Name: Vitis spp.

Comments: Wild grapevines are native to eastern North America.

I smelled these wild grapes before I saw the grapevine laden with purple fruit climbing a tree beside the trail.

Be careful not to confuse wild grapes, which are edible, with Canadian Moon Seeds, which are poisonous.

More Information: Identifying Wild Grapes or Gardening Knowhow

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/6/11

Observation Time: 2:20 p.m.

Observation Location: field near Gavins Pond Dam

Common Name: Wild Indigo

Scientific Name: Baptisia australis

Comments: It is a perennial  upright bushy plant with attractive foliage. Blossoms in mid-summer are bright yellow. Seed heads turn a deep indigo color providing winter interest.

More Information: Wikipedia

Wild Indigo

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/22/15

Observation Time: 5:00 p.m.

Observation Location: field near Gavins Pond Dam

Common Name: Wild Indigo

Scientific Name: Baptisia australis

Comments: It is a perennial  upright bushy plant with attractive foliage and yellow blossoms. Seed heads turn a deep indigo color providing winter interest.

More Information: Wikipedia

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/9/13

Observation Time: 2:15 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond area

Common Name: Wild Iris

Scientific Name: Iris virginica shrevei

Comments: These gorgeous flowers bloom in spring around Sharon. These are also known as Harlequin Blueflag and Northern Blue Flag. Look for them in swamps, marshes, and wet shorelines from Virginia to Canada. Watch honeybees and native bees land on the large petal, which must look AMAZING in their ultraviolet-shifted vision, and scoot down into the nectary through the roofed-over passage. Sometimes they’ll exit on the side if they are small enough.

More Information: Backyard and Beyond

Wild Iris

Wild Iris

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/12/11

Observation Time: 8:35 a.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Road near soccer field parking lot

Common Name: Wild mustard

Scientific Name: Barbarea vulgaris Aiton

Comments: Also called yellow rocket, or early winter cress, introduced from Eurasia.

More Information: Wikipedia

Wild Mustard

Wild Mustard

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/7/18

Observation Time: 12:50 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm (TTOR)

Common Name: Wild Onion or Crow Garlic

Scientific Name: Allium vineale 

Comments: Instead of flowers, they have bulbils, which are miniature sprouts not unlike garlic cloves.

More Information: Wikipedia or GoBotany

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/31/20

Observation Time: 3:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm (TTOR)

Common Name: Wild Violet

Scientific Name: Viola odorata

Comments: V. odorata is native to Europe and Asia, but has also been introduced to North America and Australia. It is a hardy herbaceous flowering perennial.

More Information: Wikipedia

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/7/19

Observation Time: 8:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Wild Violet

Scientific Name: Viola odorata

Comments: V. odorata is native to Europe and Asia, but has also been introduced to North America and Australia. It is a hardy herbaceous flowering perennial.

More Information: Wikipedia

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/27/14

Observation Time: 6:50 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Wisteria

Scientific Name: Wisteria spp.

Comments: Wisteria is a genus of flowering plants in the legume family, Fabaceae (Leguminosae), that includes ten species of woody climbing vines that are native to China, Korea, and Japan and as an introduced species to the Eastern United States.

More Information: Wikipedia

Wisteria

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/23/19

Observation Time: 11:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Botanical Trail

Common Name: Witch’s Butter Fungus

Scientific Name: Tremella mesenterica

Comments: Although the species appears to be growing on wood, it is actually a parasite on the (usually hidden) mycelium of a crust fungus.

More Information: MushoomExpert.com

Observer: Kathy Farrell

Observation Date: 10/31/18

Observation Location: Mountain Street area

Common Name: Witchhazel

Scientific Name: Hamamelis virginiana

Comments: Small tree, very common in some areas off Mountain Street. Known for reducing skin inflammations such as acne. Used by Native Americans for dousing sticks to find water. Small yellow blossoms in October. Leaves turn yellow in autumn.

More Information: https://www.fs.fed.us/wildflowers/plant-of-the-week/hamamelis_virginiana.shtml

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/19/19

Observation Time: 3:25 p.m.

Observation Location: Billings Loop Botanical Trail

Common Name: American Witchhazel

Scientific Name: Hamamelis virginiana

Comments: This specimen was observed in a shady, wooded area near the Sharon Friends of Conservation botanical trail.

More Information: Carolina Nature

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/6/20

Observation Time: 9:40 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm (TTOR)

Common Name: Wood Anemone

Scientific Name: Anemone quinquefolia

Comments: Also called wood windflower, wood anemone is one of the earliest blooming flowers in the rich, moist forests of New England. Look for showy white flowers poking above the dissected leaves, only 3 inches (7 cm) tall. These offer food to pollinators searching for nectar early in the season. Like other anemones, wood anemone doesn’t have true petals, but petal-like sepals. Wood anemone may have four to nine sepals, most commonly five.

More Information: Go Botany

Wood anemones flowers usually have five sepals, but not always.

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/20/20

Observation Time: 10:20 a.m.

Observation Location: near Gavins Pond

Common Name: Yellow Birch Tree

Scientific Name: Betula alleghaniensis

Comments: A large and important lumber species of birch native to North-eastern North America. It has shaggy bark.

More Information: Wikipedia

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/27/19

Observation Time: 2:15 p.m.

Observation Location: Conservation land near Morse & Lakeview

Common Name: Yellow Birch Tree

Scientific Name: Betula alleghaniensis

Comments: A large and important lumber species of birch native to North-eastern North America. It has shaggy bark.

More Information: Wikipedia

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/26/15

Observation Time: 1:40 p.m.

Observation Location: meadow near Morse and Lakeview Streets

Common Name: Yellow Hawkweed

Scientific Name: Hieracium caespitosum

Comments: Yellow hawkweed is native to Europe and was introduced as an ornamental into New York in 1879. It is now a destructive weed of pastureland. It can colonize a wide range of habitats with sandy or gravelly soils.

More Information: Go Botany

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/13/19

Observation Time: 11:30 a.m.

Observation Location: near footbridge over Beaver Brook

Common Name: Yellow Patches Mushroom

Scientific Name: Amanita flavoconia

Comments: Amanita flavoconia, commonly known as yellow patches, yellow wart, orange Amanita, or yellow-dust Amanita, is a species of mushroom in the family Amanitaceae. It has an orangish-yellow cap with yellowish-orange patches or warts, a yellowish-orange annulus, and a white to orange stem. Common and widespread throughout eastern North America, Amanita flavoconia grows on the ground in broad-leaved and mixed forests, especially in mycorrhizal association with hemlock.

Mushrooms of the genus Amanita account for most mushroom-related deaths.

More information: iNaturalist

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/29/14

Observation Time: 12:20 p.m.

Observation Location: Borderland State Park

Common Name: Yellow star-grass

Scientific Name: Hypoxis hirsuta

Comments: Yellow star-grass is the only native wildflower with a six-petaled yellow blossom.

More Information: U.S. Wildflowers

Yellow Star-grass

Yellow Star-grass

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 10/3/10

Observation Time: 9:10 a.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Road

Common Name: Yellow Toadflax (a.k.a. Common Toadflax)

Scientific Name: Linaria vulgaris

Comments: Also known as butter and eggs plant or wild snapdragon, this invasive perennial weed from Eurasia thrives in poor soil where there is little competition from larger plants.

More Information: Wikipedia

Yellow Toadflax

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