Sightings – Flowers

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/2/11

Observation Time: 1:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Road near soccer field parking lot

Common Name: Beach Rose

Scientific Name: Rosa rugosa

More Information: University of Rhode Island

Beach Rose

 

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/12/11

Observation Time: 8:15 a.m.

Observation Location: meadow near Gavins Pond dam

Common Name: Bird’s Foot Violet

Scientific Name: Viola pedata

Comments: The leaves of this pretty wildflower are reminiscent of bird’s feet. Not a common violet locally, only one site in Blue Hills. Likes dry sandy soils; has also been spotted in woods north of Knollwood Cemetery in Sharon.

More Information: US Wildflowers Database (USDA)

Bird's Foot Violet

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/30/14

Observation Time: 12:05 p.m.

Observation Location: Power lines near Walpole St.

Common Name: Bird’s Foot Violet

Scientific Name: Viola pedata

Comments: Bird-foot violets are perennials with five-petaled flowers that bloom from March to June. The flowers are typically blue, but can range from white to purple. They spread by sending out rhizomes. The fan-shaped leaves have three lobes which are said to resemble bird feet.

More Information: US Wildflowers Database (USDA)

Bird's Foot Violet

Bird's Foot Violet

 

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/6/11

Observation Time: 1:40 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Road (bridge near soccer
fields)

Common Name: Bittersweet Nightshade

Scientific Name: Solanum dulcamara

More Information: King County, WA

Bittersweet Nightshade

Bittersweet Nightshade

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/23/09

Observation Time: 9:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Road

Common Name: Black-eyed Susans

Scientific Name: Rudbeckia hirta

Comments: The genus name honors Olaus Rudbeck, who was a professor of botany at the University of Uppsala in Sweden and was one of Linnaeus’s teachers. The specific epithet “hirta” refers to the trichomes (hairs) occurring on leaves and stems.

More Information: USDA

Black-eyed Susans

 

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/5/13

Observation Time: 6:15 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond area

Common Name: Black-eyed Susans

Scientific Name: Rudbeckia hirta

Comments: A type of daisy, these were growing wild in the field near Gavins Pond Dam.

More Information: USDA

Black-eyed Susans

 

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/1/18

Observation Time: 10:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Bloodroot

Scientific Name: Sanguinaria canadensis

Comments: Blood-root is an attractive spring ephemeral, traditionally used in cough remedies. However, it has been characterized as unsafe by the United States Food and Drug Administration because of the presence of the toxic alkaloid sanguinarine. This flower drops its petals within a day or two of blooming.

Please do not dig up wildflowers!

More Information: Go Botany

 

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/31/11

Observation Time: 3:15 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond area

Common Name: Blue Flag Iris

Scientific Name: Iris versicolor

More Information: Wikipedia

Blue Flag Iris

Observer: Peter Higgins

Observation Date: 06/08/08

Observation Time: 6:55 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Blue Flag Iris

Scientific Name: Iris versicolor

Comments: This beautiful group of wild blue flag iris was growing in the field near the boardwalk.

More Information: LakeForest.edu

Iris

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/31/11

Observation Time: 4:05 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond area

Common Name: Blue Toadflax

Scientific Name: Nuttallanthus canadensis

More Information: Conn. Botanical Society

Blue Toadflax

 

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/11/15

Observation Time: 3:15 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond area

Common Name: Blue Toadflax

Scientific Name: Nuttallanthus canadensis

Comments: Flowers from April to September.

More Information: Conn. Botanical Society

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/14/11

Observation Time: 3:20 p.m.

Observation Location: meadow near Gavins Pond dam

Common Name: Blueberry

Scientific Name: Vaccinium corymbosum

Comments: Blueberries grow wild in the woods around Sharon, often near ponds and streams, where their roots can access moisture during dry weather. They flower in May and ripen in mid-summer.

More Information: Mother Earth News

Blueberry

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/14/09

Observation Time: 11:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm, Trustees of Reservations land

Common Name: Bull Thistle

Scientific Name: Cirsium vulgare

More Information: UGA Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health

Bull Thistle

 

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/15/12

Observation Time: 5:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Rd. soccer field parking lot

Common Name: Bull Thistle

Scientific Name: Cirsium vulgare

Comments: The beautiful blossom of the bull thistle comes with sharp thorns.

More Information: Wikipedia

Bull Thistle

 

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/17/14

Observation Time: 12:55 p.m.

Observation Location: Beaver Brook near tennis courts

Common Name: Canada Mayflower

Scientific Name: Maianthemum canadense

Comments: This common plant carpets the forest floor in many parts of Sharon.

More Information: Wikipedia

Canada Mayflower

 

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/4/11

Observation Time: 2:40 p.m.

Observation Location: Conservation land near Billings Street

Common Name: Canada Mayflower

Scientific Name: Maianthemum canadense

Comments: Carpets the ground in many wooded areas of Sharon.

More Information: Wikipedia

Canada Mayflower

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/14/09

Observation Time: 11:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm, Trustees of Reservations land

Common Name: Celandine

Scientific Name: Chelidonium majus

More Information: Flora Health Herb Encyclopedia

Celandine

 

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/27/15

Observation Time: 2:45 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Road near soccer fields

Common Name: Chicory

Scientific Name: Cichorium intybus

Comments: A perennial herb with blue, lavender, or occasionally white flowers, chicory grows as a wild plant on roadsides in its native Europe, and in North America and Australia, where it has become naturalized. Common chicory is also known as blue sailors, succory, and coffeeweed.

More Information: Wikipedia

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/7/10

Observation Time: 7:05 a.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Road near soccer fields

Common Name: Chicory

Scientific Name: Cichorium intybus

Comments: A perennial herb with blue, lavender, or occasionally white flowers, chicory grows as a wild plant on roadsides in its native Europe, and in North America and Australia, where it has become naturalized. Common chicory is also known as blue sailors, succory, and coffeeweed.

More Information: Wikipedia

Chicory

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/5/18

Observation Time: 8:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Common Blue Violet

Scientific Name: Viola sororia

Comments: For information, see: http://thebotanicalhiker.blogspot.com/2015/04/eating-wild-identifying-wild-edible.html

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/23/18

Observation Time: 8:55 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm (TTOR)

Common Name: Common Buttercup

Scientific Name: Ranunculus acris

Comments: The Common Buttercup (Ranunculus acris); also called Tall Buttercup, Meadow Buttercup and Blister Plant; is a perennial forb/herb in the Ranunculaceae family. The family and genus names come from the Latin for “little frog” because this family prefers wet areas. It’s also called Tall Crowfoot because of the irregular   shape of the leaves. The species name is from the Latin for “bad tasting,” that is, acrid. This plant has a very acrid fluid (glycoside ranunculin) that discourages foraging by animals.

More Information: French Hill Pond Field Plants and Go Botany

 

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/11/10

Observation Time: 9:45 a.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Road

Common Name: Common Mullein

Scientific Name: Verbascum thapsus

Comments: Mullein is widely used for herbal remedies, with well-established emollient and astringent properties. Mullein remedies are especially recommended for coughs and related problems, but also used in topical applications against a variety of skin problems. The plant has also been used to make dyes and torches.

More Information: Wikipedia

Common Mullein

 

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/28/10

Observation Time: 1:55 p.m.

Observation Location: 147 Wolomolopoag St., Sharon

Common Name: Daisy Fleabane

Scientific Name: Erigeron annuus

Comments: Fleabanes get their common name from an old belief that they repelled fleas and other pestiferous insects. Early European settlers in North America stuffed mattresses with fleabane and hung clusters of plants in their cabins to drive out fleas. The custom persisted for generations, even though Daisy Fleabane appears to have no insect-repelling ability whatsoever. In fact, the plant ATTRACTS insects—not only pollinators but also tiny herbivores that nibble away the ray flowers and leave only the central disk.

More Information: Hilton Pond Center

Daisy Fleabane

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/23/09

Observation Time: 9:45 a.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Road

Common Name: Daisy Fleabane

Scientific Name: Erigeron annuus

Comments: Fleabanes get their common name from an old belief that they repelled fleas and other pestiferous insects. Early European settlers in North America stuffed mattresses with fleabane and hung clusters of plants in their cabins to drive out fleas. The custom persisted for generations, even though Daisy Fleabane appears to have no insect-repelling ability whatsoever. In fact, the plant ATTRACTS insects—not only pollinators but also tiny herbivores that nibble away the ray flowers and leave only the central disk.

Daisy Fleabane

 

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/23/18

Observation Time: 9:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Dandelion

Scientific Name: Taraxacum officinale

Comments:  Native to Europe, it has spread nearly worldwide. The young leaves can be eaten raw or cooked. The taproot can be boiled and eaten or dried and ground as a base for a hot drink.

More Information: Go Botany

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/6/14

Observation Time: 12:45 p.m.

Observation Location: near Gavins Pond

Common Name: Deptford Pink

Scientific Name: Dianthus armeria

Comments:The Deptford pink is a European species, introduced and widespread in North America. Its name refers to the English town near London in which this species was formerly common.

More Information: Go Botany

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/14/11

Observation Time: 2:10 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Dwarf ginseng

Scientific Name: Panax trifolius

Comments: This diminutive variety of ginseng has no “medicinal” properties.
It blooms in spring and dies back in summer.

More Information: US Forest Service

Dwarf Ginseng

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/4/11

Observation Time: 2:20 p.m.

Observation Location: conservation land near Billings Street

Common Name: Golden Ragwort

Scientific Name: Senecio aureus

Comments: Golden Ragwort is a biannual plant with a yellow flower that grows upto a height of 2 feet and belongs to Asteraceae family (i.e. asters).

More Information: HealthBenefitsTimes.com or Illinois Wildflowers

Golden Ragwort

Golden Ragwort

Golden Ragwort

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 9/12/09

Observation Time: 11:25 a.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond

Common Name: Goldenrod

Scientific Name: Solidago sp.

Comments: Goldenrod gets a bad rap as a cause of autumn allergies. The real culprit is ragweed. In fact, goldenrod has medicinal properties.

More Information: Great Plains Nature Center

Goldenrod

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/23/18

Observation Time: 8:40 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm (TTOR)

Common Name: Ground Ivy (a.k.a. “Gill-over-the-ground”)

Scientific Name: Glechoma hederacea

Comments: Commonly known as ground-ivy, gill-over-the-ground, creeping charlie, alehoof, tunhoof, catsfoot, field balm, and run-away-robin, it has numerous medicinal uses, and is used as a salad green in many countries. European settlers carried it around the world, and it has become a well-established introduced and naturalized plant in a wide variety of localities.

More Information: Go Botany and Wikipedia

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/30/10

Observation Time: 4:10 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Iris (harlequin blueflag)

Scientific Name: Iris versicolor

Comments: The species has been implicated in several poisoning cases of humans and animals who consumed the rhizomes, which have been found to contain a glycoside, iridin. The sap can cause dermatitis in susceptible individuals.

More Information: The Flower Expert

Iris (Harlequin Blueflag)

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/24/10

Observation Time: 7:50 a.m.

Observation Location: near Gavins Pond outflow pool

Common Name: Jewelweed

Scientific Name: Impatiens capensis

Comments: Jewelweed, which often grows in disturbed areas near poison ivy, is also an antidote for poison ivy.

More Information: Altnature.com

Jewelweed

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 9/22/13

Observation Time: 2:10 p.m.

Observation Location: King Phillip’s Rock area

Common Name: Ladies’ Tresses Orchid

Scientific Name: Spiranthes cernua

Comments: These wild white orchids grow on a spiral stalk (hence the name Spiranthes).

More Information: Go Orchids or Nature Northeast

Ladies' Tresses Orchid

Ladies' Tresses Orchid

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/15/13

Observation Time: 6:20 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond area

Common Name: Lanceleaf Tickseed

Scientific Name: Coreopsis lanceolata

More Information: Go Botany

Lanceleaf Tickseed

Lanceleaf Tickseed

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 8/3/10

Observation Time: 9:45 a.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond

Common Name: Little Floatingheart

Scientific Name: Nymphoides cordata

Comments: The little floatinghearts are the smaller, darker, heart-shaped floating pads visible in the photo among the bigger, greener rounder water lilies. The small, five-petalled white flowers are those of little floatingheart. Water lilies have much bigger floating blossoms (see photo taken September 12, 2009).

More Information: USDA

Little Floatingheart

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/4/11

Observation Time: 3:00 p.m.

Observation Location: conservation land near Billings Street

Common Name: Maple-leaf Viburnum

Scientific Name: Viburnum acerifolium

Comments: Maple-leaf viburnum has long been cultivated for its attractive summer flowers and foliage; then the autumn leaves turn rose-purple and contrast with the mature dark fruits. The plants will thrive in moist soils and a range of light conditions but they are a good choice for dry soils in deep shade. They can be used along forest edges, streamsides, and lakeshores.

More Information: USDA Plant Guide

Maple-Leaf Viburnum

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/13/14

Observation Time: 8:05 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: May apple

Scientific Name: Podophyllum peltatum

Comments: Check out this well-written blog about May apples:

 66 SQUARE FEET (PLUS) blog

May Apple

Observer: Peter Higgins

Observation Date: 10/17/08

Observation Time: 5:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm (Trustees of Reservations)

Common Name: Milkweed

Scientific Name: Asclepias syriaca

More Information: Emily Compost

Milkweed

Milkweed

Milkweed

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/22/15

Observation Time: 5:20 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond area

Common Name: Milkweed

Scientific Name: Asclepias syriaca

Comments: Monarch butterflies depend on milkweed as a food source for their caterpillars. The advent of genetically modified “Roundup-ready” corn and soybeans has facilitated large-scale application of herbicides, reducing the availability of milkweed to migrating monarchs. Hence, the monarch population is in steep decline. Homeowners wanting to help monarchs can inadvertently hurt them by planting the wrong kind of milkweed (Ophryocystis elektroscirrha). Unfortunately, native milkweed that monarchs need is harder to propagate.

More Information: Science

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/27/15

Observation Time: 2:45 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond area

Common Name: Milkweed flower

Scientific Name: Asclepias syriaca

Comments: Many species of butterflies including monarchs depend on milkweed as a food source for their caterpillars. The advent of genetically modified “Roundup-ready” corn and soybeans has facilitated large-scale application of herbicides, reducing the availability of milkweed to migrating monarchs. Hence, the monarch population is in steep decline. Homeowners wanting to help monarchs can inadvertently hurt them by planting the wrong kind of milkweed (Ophryocystis elektroscirrha). Unfortunately, native milkweed that monarchs need is harder to propagate.

More Information: Science

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/14/14

Observation Time: 10:50 a.m.

Observation Location: Sharon

Common Name: Narrow-leaved spring beauty

Scientific Name: Claytonia virginica L.

Comments: This rare wildflower is only found in nine towns in Massachusetts. Please do not dig up wildflowers!

More Information: Mass. Natural Heritage & Endangered Species Program

Narrow-Leaved Spring Beauty

Narrow-Leaved Spring Beauty

Narrow-Leaved Spring Beauty

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/26/10

Observation Time: 5:25 p.m.

Observation Location: edge of woods by Gavins Pond near soccer fields

Common Name: Northern dewberry

Scientific Name: Rubus flagellaris

Comments: Dewberries are found in the eastern half of North America. Indians prepared a tea using northern dewberry roots to calm stomach irritation. The fruits are large and tasty. They can be eaten raw or used in jams, jellies, and sauces.

Dewberries start out green, then turn to orange, then red, and finally black when fully ripe.

More Information: Wikipedia

Dewberry blossom photographed on 5/26/10:

Northern Dewberry

Unripe dewberries photographed on 6/27/10:

Northern Dewberry

Ripening dewberries photographed on 6/28/10 at 147 Wolomolopoag St.

Northern Dewberry

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/25/15

Observation Time: 2:25 p.m.

Observation Location: Town-owned conservation land at Morse and Lakeview Streets

Common Name: Palmate Hop Clover

Scientific Name: Trifolium aureum

Comments: Palmate hop clover is an exotic species that is widespread in New England. The common name derives from the fact that as the flower heads age, the florets fold down and become brown, resembling dried hops.

More Information: Go Botany

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/24/10

Observation Time: 8:25 a.m.

Observation Location: 4 Gavins Pond Rd.

Common Name: Peony

Scientific Name: Paeonia spp.

Comments: Long ago, some observant gardener noticed that ants on peony buds always meant the flowers would open soon. And so a bit of folk wisdom was born: Peonies cannot open until ants eat away the seal that keeps the buds closed. But it isn’t true. The thing the ants are eating is nectar, not glue, and what this does for the peony is make sure there are plenty of ants around to eat any soft-bodied insects that might like to eat peonies.

More Information: Wikipedia

Peony

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/22/18

Observation Time: 9:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Pink Lady’s Slipper orchid

Scientific Name: Cypripedium acaule

Comments: Pink lady’s slippers probably won’t survive if you try to transplant them, so please don’t dig them up.

More Information: Wikipedia

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/27/14

Observation Time: 9:05 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Pink Lady’s Slipper orchid

Scientific Name: Cypripedium acaule

Comments: Pink lady’s slippers won’t survive if you try to transplant them, so please don’t dig them up.

More Information: Wikipedia

Pink Lady's Slipper Orchid

Pink Lady's Slipper Orchid

Pink Lady's Slipper Orchid

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/4/11

Observation Time: 3:20 p.m.

Observation Location: conservation land near Billings Street

Common Name: Pipsissewa

Scientific Name: Chimaphila maculata

Comments: The Creek Indians called it ‘pipsisikweu’ – which means ‘breaks into small pieces’ – after the supposed ability to break down gallstones and kidney stones. Native Americans used its leaf tea to treat rheumatism and stomach problems, and crushed leaves were applied as a poultice to sores and wounds.

Also called spotted wintergreen, it is endangered in Illinois and Maine. In New York it is considered “Exploitably Vulnerable.”

More Information: Wikipedia

Pipsissewa

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 9/12/09

Observation Time: 11:20 a.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond

Common Name: Purple Loosestrife

Scientific Name: Lythrum salicaria L.

Comments: Sometimes called “purple plague,” purple loosestrife is an invasive species. Neponset River Watershed Association has a program to propagate and disperse galerucella beetles that eat nothing but purple loosestrife.

More Information: The Nature Conservancy

Purple Loosestrife

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/22/15

Observation Time: 5:20 a.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond area

Common Name: Queen Anne’s Lace

Scientific Name: Daucus carota

Comments: Daucus carota, whose common names include wild carrot, bird’s nest, bishop’s lace, and Queen Anne’s lace (North America), is a white, flowering plant in the family Apiaceae, native to temperate regions of Europe and southwest Asia, and naturalized to North America and Australia.

Domesticated carrots are cultivars of a subspecies, Daucus carota subsp. sativus.

More Information: Wikipedia

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/23/18

Observation Time: 8:10 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Rattlesnake Root

Scientific Name: Prenanthes  

Comments: Roots look like the rattle of a rattlesnake.

More Information: Youtube

 

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/4/10

Observation Time: 12:10 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Road soccer field parking lot

Common Name: Red clover

Scientific Name: Trifolium pratense

Comments: It is widely grown as a fodder crop, valued for its nitrogen fixation, which increases soil fertility. For these reasons, it is used as a green manure crop.

More Information: Wikipedia

Red Clover

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/20/11

Observation Time: 3:25 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond

Common Name: Rough-fruited cinquefoil

Scientific Name: Potentilla recta

Comments: Native to Europe and Asia. Introduced and naturalized in North America. Found along roads and in disturbed sites. Thrives in full sun and tolerates dry conditions. Flowers from June to August.

More Information: MinnesotaSeasons.com

Rough-Fruited Cinquefoil

Rough-Fruited Cinquefoil

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/13/15

Observation Time: 4:10 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond

Common Name: Rough-fruited cinquefoil

Scientific Name: Potentilla recta

Comments: Native to Europe and Asia. Introduced and naturalized in North America. Found along roads and in disturbed sites. Thrives in full sun and tolerates dry conditions. Flowers from June to August. Blossoms have five heart-shaped petals.

More Information: MinnesotaSeasons.com

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/9/13

Observation Time: 4:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond area

Common Name: Rugosa Rose

Scientific Name: Rosa rugosa

Comments: In late summer, this beautiful flower, which comes from Asia, will become a reddish ball called a rose hip. Rose hips are used for tisanes, jam, jelly, syrup, soup, beverages, pies, bread, wine, and marmalade. They can also be eaten raw, like a berry, if care is used to avoid the hairs inside the fruit.

More Information: Wikipedia

Rugosa Rose

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/1/18

Observation Time: 10:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Siberian Squill

Scientific Name: Scilla Siberica

Comments: Siberian Squill was brought to this country as an ornamental and is still sold for that purpose, but it has also escaped into the wild and become invasive. It readily spreads itself and is difficult to get rid of, as broken roots often resprout. It is very hardy and cold tolerant, and is left untouched by critters from voles to deer.

More Information: Minnesota Wildflowers

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/29/11

Observation Time: 11:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Road near soccer field parking lot

Common Name: Silver Cinquefoil

Scientific Name: Potentilla argentea

Comments: Curiously, one of the yellow blossoms in the photo has six petals.

More Information: Minnesota Wild Flowers

Silver Cinquefoil

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/27/10

Observation Time: 8:15 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Road-soccer parking area

Common Name: Spotted knapweed

Scientific Name: Centaurea maculosa

Comments: Knapweed is a pioneer species found in recently disturbed sites or openings. Once it has been established at a disturbed site, it continues to spread into the surrounding habitat. This species outcompetes natives through at least three methods:

  1. A tap root that sucks up water faster than the root systems of its neighbors,
  2. Quick spread through high seed production, and
  3. Low palatability, meaning it is less likely to be chosen as food by herbivores. It is also suspected to be allelopathic, releasing a toxin from its roots that stunts the growth of nearby plants of other species.

More Information: Wikipedia

Spotted Knapweed

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/22/15

Observation Time: 4:40 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond area

Common Name: Spotted Knapweed

Scientific Name: Centaurea maculosa

Comments: Spotted knapweed is poisonous to other plants, creating barren areas where only knapweed grows. It is a threat to pastures and dry ecosystems including prairies and dunes.  Can be a skin irritant.

More Information: Michigan Invasive Species

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/25/15

Observation Time: 2:25 p.m.

Observation Location: Town-owned conservation land at Morse and Lakeview Streets

Common Name: Spotted St. John’s Wort

Scientific Name: Hypericum punctatum

Comments: Spotted St. John’s-wort can be most easily distinguished from the other St. John’s-worts by the dark dots and streaks on the upper surface of the yellow petals. In the other species these markings are absent or confined to near the petal margins.

More Information: Go Botany and Wikipedia

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/11/15

Observation Time: 3:15 p.m.

Observation Location: near Gavins Pond

Common Name: Spreading Dogbane

Scientific Name: Apocynum androsaemifolium

Comments: Spreading dogbane is common in North America, and is widespread across most of the United States and Canada, and in Alaska, California, and northeast Mexico. The plant is poisonous, due to the cardiac glycosides it contains.

Note the ants feeding on the nectar in the blossoms in the close-up photo below.

More Information: Wikipedia

 

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/2/11

Observation Time: 1:05 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Road near soccer field parking lot

Common Name: Star of Bethlehem

Scientific Name: Ornithogalum umbellatum

Comments: The Star of Bethlehem is a genus (Ornithogalum) of perennial plants native to southern Europe belonging to the family Hyacinthaceae. Growing from a bulb, it has grass-like basal leaves and a slender stalk, up to 30 cm tall, bearing clusters of star-shaped white flowers striped with green.

More Information: Illinois Wildflowers

Star of Bethlehem

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/14/11

Observation Time: 2:05 p.m.

Observation Location: Town conservation land near Beaver Brook

Common Name: Starflower

Scientific Name: Trientalis borealis

Comments: This member of the primrose family likes moist woods. It blooms in May. Please do not dig up native wildflowers. They typically do not survive transplantation.

More Information: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture

Starflower

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/22/18

Observation Time: 9:35 a.m.

Observation Location: Town conservation land near Beaver Brook

Common Name: Starflower

Scientific Name: Trientalis borealis

Comments: This member of the primrose family likes moist woods. It blooms in May. Please do not dig up native wildflowers. They typically do not survive transplantation.

More Information: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/24/10

Observation Time: 3:25 p.m.

Observation Location: Beaver Brook near tennis courts

Common Name: Swamp azalea

Scientific Name: Rhododendron viscosum

Comments: This typical wetland shrub is sometimes called the Clammy Azalea because of its very sticky corolla. The species name means sticky in Latin. The flowers appear after the leaves.

More Information: University of Texas

Swamp Azalea

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 9/22/11

Observation Time: 3:25 p.m.

Observation Location: field near Gavins Pond

Common Name: Sweet Everlasting or Rabbit Tobacco

Scientific Name: Pseudognaphalium obtusifolium

Comments: This wildflower is a member of a group of daisy-family herbs called cudweeds. Heads never open wider than this.

More Information: Wildflowers of the Southeastern US

Sweet Everlasting

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/31/10

Observation Time: 10:40 a.m.

Observation Location: Beaver Brook near tennis courts

Common Name: Sweet Pepperbush (Summersweet)

Scientific Name: Clethra alnifolia

Comments: Very fragrant.

More Information: Virginia Native Plant Society

Sweet Pepperbush (Summersweet)

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/7/18

Observation Time: 3:10 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm (TTOR)

Common Name: Tall Meadow Rue

Scientific Name:Thalictrum pubescens

Comments: Meadow rue flowers have no petals; the conspicuous part of the flower is the white filaments of the stamens.

More Information: Connecticut Botanical Society

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 8/23/15

Observation Time: 5:45 p.m.

Observation Location: bank of Hammershop Pond at Ames and Cottage Streets.

Common Name: Virginia Marsh-St. John’s-wort

Scientific Name: Triadenum virginicum

Comments: Occurs only in wetlands. (Wetland indicator code: OBL).

Please do not dig up wildflowers!

More Information: Go Botany

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/6/11

Observation Time: 1:15 p.m.

Observation Location: bank of Beaver Brook (near tennis courts)

Common Name: Water Forget-Me-Not

Scientific Name: Myosotis scorpioides

Comments: Water forget-me-nots are usually found in damp or wet habitats, such as bogs, ponds, streams, ditches, fen and rivers. While it favors wet ground, it can survive submerged in water, and often can form floating rafts.

More Information: Wikipedia

Water Forget-Me-Not

Water Forget-Me-Not

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 9/12/09

Observation Time: 11:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond (near the dam)

Common Name: Water Lily

Scientific Name: Nymphaea odorata

Comments: It usually flowers only from early morning until noon. The black specks in the first photo might be black aphids.

More Information: The University of Texas at Austin

Water Lily

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/13/13

Observation Time: 11:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond

Common Name: Water Shield

Scientific Name: Brasenia schreberi

Comments: Leaf floats like a water lily, but the stem is attached in middle.

More Information: USDA Forest Service

Water Shield

Water Shield

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 8/24/09

Observation Time: 12:30 p.m.

Observation Location: Margin of wetland behind Hunter’s Ridge

Common Name: White Baneberry (a.k.a. “Doll’s Eyes”)

Scientific Name: Actaea pachypoda

Comments: Needs continuously damp soil. Seeds, which are highly toxic, were once used as eyes for rag dolls.

More Information: Dave’s Garden

White Baneberry

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 9/9/12

Observation Time: 3:15 p.m.

Observation Location: Sandy Ridge Circle

Common Name: White Baneberry, or Doll’s Eyes

Scientific Name: Actaea pachypoda

Comments: Both the berries and the entire plant are considered poisonous to humans. The berries contain cardiogenic toxins which can have an immediate sedative effect on human cardiac muscle tissue, and are the most poisonous part of the plant. Ingestion of the berries can lead to cardiac arrest and death.

The berries are harmless to birds, the plant’s primary seed dispersers.

More Information: Wikipedia

White Baneberry

White Baneberry

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/14/09

Observation Time: 11:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm, Trustees of Reservations land

Common Name: Whorled Loosestrife

Scientific Name: Lysimachia quadrifolia

More Information: Wild Flowers of Sleepy Hollow Lake

Whorled Loosestrife

3 Whorls:

Whorled Loosestrife

4 Whorls:

Whorled Loosestrife

5 Whorls:

Whorled Loosestrife

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/21/16

Observation Time: 3:20 p.m.

Observation Location: Kendall Estate, Moose Hill Street

Common Name: Wild geranium

Scientific Name: Geranium maculatum

Comments: Geranium maculatum, the wild geranium, spotted geranium, or wood geranium, is a perennial plant native to woodlands of eastern North America, from southern Manitoba and southwestern Quebec south to Alabama and Georgia and west to Oklahoma and South Dakota.

More Information: Wikipedia

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