Sightings – Flowers

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/9/19

Observation time: 4:15 p.m.

Observation Location: beginning of the trail at the end of Brook Road

Common Name: Money Flower (a.k.a. Honesty)

Scientific Name: Lunaria annua

Comments: The seed pods of the money flower are shaped like coins. This flower originated from the Balkans and southwest Asia. Its popularity as a garden flower means that colonies are most often seen near to towns and villages. It thrives in partial shade on woodland edges.

More information: First Nature

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/30/20

Observation Time: 2:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm (TTOR)

Common Name: Mouse-ear chickweed

Scientific Name: Cerastium fontanum

Comments: Mouse-ear chickweed is a herb. Herbs are broad-leaved, herbaceous (non-woody) plants. Herbaceous plants are also known as forbs or wildflowers.

More Information: Kansas Native Plants

Observer: Deborah Radovsky

Observation Date: 6/7/20

Observation Time: 8:45 a.m.

Observation Location: Quincy St.

Common Name: Multiflora rose

Scientific Name: Rosa multiflora

Comments: Multiflora rose is a deciduous shrub with white flowers and red fruit. Brought here from Asia, it was planted as wildlife food, and also as a living fence, due to its dense growth and sharp thorns. It can grow to 10 feet high or more, and is typically wider than it is tall.

It forms dense thickets in fields and field edges, crowding out other species. It also grows in open wetlands and in forests where canopy openings occur.

More Information: Massachusetts Audubon

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/14/14

Observation Time: 10:50 a.m.

Observation Location: Sharon

Common Name: Narrow-leaved spring beauty

Scientific Name: Claytonia virginica L.

Comments: This rare wildflower is only found in nine towns in Massachusetts. Please do not dig up wildflowers!

More Information: Mass. Natural Heritage & Endangered Species Program

Narrow-Leaved Spring Beauty

Narrow-Leaved Spring Beauty

Narrow-Leaved Spring Beauty

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 8/18/20

Observation Time: 11:35 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm (formerly the Kendall Estate)

Common Name: New York Ironweed

Scientific Name: Vernonia noveboracensis

Comments: New York ironweed is a tall, perennial wildflower that produces small purple blossoms in August and September. This specimen is approximately 8 feet tall.

More Information: Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/14/20

Observation Time: 5:20 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm (TTOR)

Common Name: Palmate Hop Clover

Scientific Name: Trifolium aureum

Comments: Palmate hop clover is an exotic species that is widespread in New England. The common name derives from the fact that as the flower heads age, the florets fold down and become brown, resembling dried hops.

More Information: Go Botany

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/25/15

Observation Time: 2:25 p.m.

Observation Location: Town-owned conservation land at Morse and Lakeview Streets

Common Name: Palmate Hop Clover

Scientific Name: Trifolium aureum

Comments: Palmate hop clover is an exotic species that is widespread in New England. The common name derives from the fact that as the flower heads age, the florets fold down and become brown, resembling dried hops.

More Information: Go Botany

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/24/10

Observation Time: 8:25 a.m.

Observation Location: 4 Gavins Pond Rd.

Common Name: Peony

Scientific Name: Paeonia spp.

Comments: Long ago, some observant gardener noticed that ants on peony buds always meant the flowers would open soon. And so a bit of folk wisdom was born: Peonies cannot open until ants eat away the seal that keeps the buds closed. But it isn’t true. The thing the ants are eating is nectar, not glue, and what this does for the peony is make sure there are plenty of ants around to eat any soft-bodied insects that might like to eat peonies.

More Information: Wikipedia

Peony

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/27/20

Observation Time: 5:10 p.m.

Observation Location: in the woods near the footbridge over Beaver Brook

Common Name: Pink Lady’s Slipper orchid

Scientific Name: Cypripedium acaule

Comments: Pink lady’s slippers probably won’t survive if you try to transplant them, so please don’t dig them up.

More Information: Wikipedia

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/22/18

Observation Time: 9:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Pink Lady’s Slipper orchid

Scientific Name: Cypripedium acaule

Comments: Pink lady’s slippers probably won’t survive if you try to transplant them, so please don’t dig them up.

More Information: Wikipedia

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/27/14

Observation Time: 9:05 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Pink Lady’s Slipper orchid

Scientific Name: Cypripedium acaule

Comments: Pink lady’s slippers won’t survive if you try to transplant them, so please don’t dig them up.

More Information: Wikipedia

Pink Lady's Slipper Orchid

Pink Lady's Slipper Orchid

Pink Lady's Slipper Orchid

Observer: Josh Simons

Observation Date: 5/31/20

Observation Time: 10:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill area

Common Name: Pink Lady’s Slipper orchid

Scientific Name: Cypripedium acaule

Comments: Pink lady’s slippers probably won’t survive if you try to transplant them, so please don’t dig them up.

More Information: Wikipedia

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/13/20

Observation Time: 5:15 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Purple Foxglove

Scientific Name: Digitalis purpurea

Comments: Purple foxglove, Digitalis purpurea, is a biennial or short-lived herbaceous perennial from western Europe in the plantain family. It is sometimes called common foxglove, fairy gloves, fairy bells, or lady’s glove. Purple foxglove is naturally quite variable in size and flower color.

As its scientific name suggests, foxglove was the source of chemicals in the drug digitalis.

More Information: University of Wisconsin

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 9/12/09

Observation Time: 11:20 a.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond

Common Name: Purple Loosestrife

Scientific Name: Lythrum salicaria L.

Comments: Sometimes called “purple plague,” purple loosestrife is an invasive species. Neponset River Watershed Association has a program to propagate and disperse galerucella beetles that eat nothing but purple loosestrife.

More Information: The Nature Conservancy

Purple Loosestrife

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/22/15

Observation Time: 5:20 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond area

Common Name: Queen Anne’s Lace

Scientific Name: Daucus carota

Comments: Daucus carota, whose common names include wild carrot, bird’s nest, bishop’s lace, and Queen Anne’s lace (North America), is a white, flowering plant in the family Apiaceae, native to temperate regions of Europe and southwest Asia, and naturalized to North America and Australia.

Domesticated carrots are cultivars of a subspecies, Daucus carota subsp. sativus.

More Information: Wikipedia

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/23/18

Observation Time: 8:10 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Rattlesnake Root

Scientific Name: Prenanthes sp.

Comments: Roots look like the rattle of a rattlesnake.

More Information: Youtube

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/9/20

Observation Time: 4:05 p.m.

Observation Location: trail near Brook Road

Common Name: Three-leaved Rattlesnake Root

Scientific Name: Nabalus trifoliolatus

Comments: Three-leaved rattlesnake-root is found throughout New England. It has a trumpet-shaped white flower that blooms in late summer.

More Information: GoBotany

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/31/20

Observation Time: 4:40 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm (TTOR)

Common Name: Red clover

Scientific Name: Trifolium pratense

Comments: Clover is widely grown as a fodder crop, valued for its nitrogen fixation, which increases soil fertility. For these reasons, it is used as a green manure crop.

This specimen had not yet produced its reddish flowers, but the two-tone pattern on its leaves is characteristic of red clover.

More Information: Wikipedia

I took this photo near the same location on 6/2/20:

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/4/10

Observation Time: 12:10 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Road soccer field parking lot

Common Name: Red clover

Scientific Name: Trifolium pratense

Comments: It is widely grown as a fodder crop, valued for its nitrogen fixation, which increases soil fertility. For these reasons, it is used as a green manure crop.

More Information: Wikipedia

Red Clover

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/14/20

Observation Time: 4:30 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm (TTOR)

Common Name: Rough-fruited Cinquefoil

Scientific Name: Potentilla recta

Comments: Also known as sulphur cinquefoil, this wildflower is native to Europe and Asia. Introduced and naturalized in North America. Found along roads and in disturbed sites. Thrives in full sun and tolerates dry conditions. Flowers from June to August. Blossoms have five heart-shaped petals.

More Information: MinnesotaSeasons.com

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/20/11

Observation Time: 3:25 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond

Common Name: Rough-fruited cinquefoil

Scientific Name: Potentilla recta

Comments: Native to Europe and Asia. Introduced and naturalized in North America. Found along roads and in disturbed sites. Thrives in full sun and tolerates dry conditions. Flowers from June to August.

More Information: MinnesotaSeasons.com

Rough-Fruited Cinquefoil

Rough-Fruited Cinquefoil

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/13/15

Observation Time: 4:10 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond

Common Name: Rough-fruited cinquefoil

Scientific Name: Potentilla recta

Comments: Also known as sulphur cinquefoil, this wildflower is native to Europe and Asia. Introduced and naturalized in North America. Found along roads and in disturbed sites. Thrives in full sun and tolerates dry conditions. Flowers from June to August. Blossoms have five heart-shaped petals.

More Information: MinnesotaSeasons.com

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/9/13

Observation Time: 4:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond area

Common Name: Rugosa Rose

Scientific Name: Rosa rugosa

Comments: In late summer, this beautiful flower, which comes from Asia, will become a reddish ball called a rose hip. Rose hips are used for tisanes, jam, jelly, syrup, soup, beverages, pies, bread, wine, and marmalade. They can also be eaten raw, like a berry, if care is used to avoid the hairs inside the fruit.

More Information: Wikipedia

Rugosa Rose

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/21/20

Observation Time: 4:30 p.m.

Observation Location: Along Gavins Pond Road

Common Name: Sheep’s bit

Scientific Name: Jasione montana

Comments: Sheep’s bit is an annual or biennial, native to Europe and Russia and introduced to North America’s east and west coasts. It was introduced through being grown as a garden ornamental, and is spreading westward from sandy sites in southern New England.

More Information: Go Botany

Observer: Rita Corey and Larry Myatt

Observation Date: 7/9/20

Observation Time: 9:18 a.m.

Observation Location: Mountain Street, near entrance to Rattlesnake Hill

Common Name: Shinleaf (a.k.a. White Wintergreen)

Scientific Name: Pyrola elliptica

Comments: Its common name, shinleaf, comes from the medicinal use of the plant, which produces a drug similar to aspirin.  This drug has been reported to have analgesic properties and was used on bruised shins and other wounds. A plaster made from the leaves was called a shin plaster.  

More Information: NC State Extension

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/4/20

Observation Time: 11:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Siberian Iris

Scientific Name: Iris siberica

Comments: These gaudy flowers bloom in early June.

More Information: Commonweeder.com

Blue flag irises were growing nearby.

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/1/18

Observation Time: 10:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Siberian Squill

Scientific Name: Scilla Siberica

Comments: Siberian Squill was brought to this country as an ornamental and is still sold for that purpose, but it has also escaped into the wild and become invasive. It readily spreads itself and is difficult to get rid of, as broken roots often resprout. It is very hardy and cold tolerant, and is left untouched by critters from voles to deer.

More Information: Minnesota Wildflowers

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/29/11

Observation Time: 11:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Road near soccer field parking lot

Common Name: Silver Cinquefoil

Scientific Name: Potentilla argentea

Comments: Curiously, one of the yellow blossoms in the photo has six petals.

More Information: Minnesota Wild Flowers

Silver Cinquefoil

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 9/4/20

Observation Time: 2:10 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm (TTOR)

Common Name: Slender Bush-Clover

Scientific Name: Lespedeza virginica

Comments: Slender bush-clover is a member of the pea family. Like other bush-clovers, slender bush-clover is preferentially browsed by mammalian herbivores such as deer and rabbits, as well as quail and other ground birds.

Slender bush-clover is often found in man-made or disturbed habitats. This patch was observed along a dirt road underneath power lines that are periodically cleared so maintenance crews can access the power lines.

More Information: Illinois Wildflowers and Go Botany

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/11/20

Observation Time: 3:10 p.m.

Observation Location: somewhere in Sharon. Please do not dig up wildflowers!

Common Name: Small Green Wood Orchid

Scientific Name: Platanthera clavellata

Comments: Platanthera is a large genus – about 200 species – in the large Orchidaceae (Orchid) Family. Over 30 of the Platanthera species are found in North America.

Platanthera clavellata is protected in at least four states due to its rarity in those jurisdictions. Please do not dig up wildflowers! They have a role to play in the ecosystem, and they typically do not survive transplantation.

More Information: Name That Plant

Platanthera clavellata usually has only one large leaf, located on the lower half of the stem, but may occasionally have two.

The flowers of Platanthera clavellata are pale green, greenish white, yellowish white, or dull white.

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/13/20

Observation Time: 5:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Southern Arrowwood

Scientific Name: Viburnum dentatum

Comments: Native Americans reportedly used the straight stems of this species for arrow shafts, hence the common name. The scientific name “dentatum” refers to the toothed edges of its leaves.

More Information: Missouri Botanical Garden

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/27/10

Observation Time: 8:15 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Road-soccer parking area

Common Name: Spotted knapweed

Scientific Name: Centaurea maculosa

Comments: Knapweed is a pioneer species found in recently disturbed sites or openings. Once it has been established at a disturbed site, it continues to spread into the surrounding habitat. This species outcompetes natives through at least three methods:

  1. A tap root that sucks up water faster than the root systems of its neighbors,
  2. Quick spread through high seed production, and
  3. Low palatability, meaning it is less likely to be chosen as food by herbivores. It is also suspected to be allelopathic, releasing a toxin from its roots that stunts the growth of nearby plants of other species.

More Information: Wikipedia

Spotted Knapweed

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/12/20

Observation Time: 7:00 p.m.

Observation Location: along Gavins Pond Road

Common Name: Spotted Knapweed

Scientific Name: Centaurea maculosa

Comments: Spotted knapweed is not native to North America (it came from Europe). It is poisonous to other plants, creating barren areas where only knapweed grows. It can be a skin irritant.

More Information: namethatplant.net

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/22/15

Observation Time: 4:40 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond area

Common Name: Spotted Knapweed

Scientific Name: Centaurea maculosa

Comments: Spotted knapweed is poisonous to other plants, creating barren areas where only knapweed grows. It is a threat to pastures and dry ecosystems including prairies and dunes.  Can be a skin irritant.

More Information: Michigan Invasive Species

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/25/15

Observation Time: 2:25 p.m.

Observation Location: Town-owned conservation land at Morse and Lakeview Streets

Common Name: Spotted St. John’s Wort

Scientific Name: Hypericum punctatum

Comments: Spotted St. John’s-wort can be most easily distinguished from the other St. John’s-worts by the dark dots and streaks on the upper surface of the yellow petals. In the other species these markings are absent or confined to near the petal margins.

More Information: Go Botany and Wikipedia

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/4/11

Observation Time: 3:20 p.m.

Observation Location: conservation land near Billings Street

Common Name: Spotted Wintergreen

Scientific Name: Chimaphila maculata

Comments: Also called spotted wintergreen, it is endangered in Illinois and Maine. In New York it is considered “Exploitably Vulnerable.”

More Information: Wikipedia

Pipsissewa

Observer: Rita Corey

Observation Date: 8/13/20

Observation Time: 1:55 p.m.

Observation Location: Mountain St.

Common Name: Spotted Wintergreen

Scientific Name: Chimaphila maculata

Comments: Spotted wintergreen is a highly recognizable understory species having variegated leaves with pale green veins. It is endangered in Maine.

More Information: Go Botany

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/11/15

Observation Time: 3:15 p.m.

Observation Location: near Gavins Pond

Common Name: Spreading Dogbane

Scientific Name: Apocynum androsaemifolium

Comments: Spreading dogbane is common in North America, and is widespread across most of the United States and Canada, and in Alaska, California, and northeast Mexico. The plant is poisonous, due to the cardiac glycosides it contains.

Note the ants feeding on the nectar in the blossoms in the close-up photo below.

More Information: Wikipedia

 

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/7/19

Observation Time: 7:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Spring Beauty

Scientific Name: Claytonia virginica

Comments: Its scientific name honors Colonial Virginia botanist John Clayton (1694–1773). Please do not dig up any wildflowers you may find in Sharon. Leave them for everyone to enjoy!

More Information: Wikipedia

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/31/20

Observation Time: 5:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Trustees of Reservations’ Moose Hill Farm

Common Name: Star of Bethlehem

Scientific Name: Ornithogalum umbellatum

Comments: The Star of Bethlehem is a genus (Ornithogalum) of perennial plants native to southern Europe belonging to the family Hyacinthaceae. Growing from a bulb, it has grass-like basal leaves and a slender stalk, up to 30 cm tall, bearing clusters of star-shaped white flowers striped with green.

More Information: Illinois Wildflowers

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/2/11

Observation Time: 1:05 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Road near soccer field parking lot

Common Name: Star of Bethlehem

Scientific Name: Ornithogalum umbellatum

Comments: The Star of Bethlehem is a genus (Ornithogalum) of perennial plants native to southern Europe belonging to the family Hyacinthaceae. Growing from a bulb, it has grass-like basal leaves and a slender stalk, up to 30 cm tall, bearing clusters of star-shaped white flowers striped with green.

More Information: Illinois Wildflowers

Star of Bethlehem

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/14/11

Observation Time: 2:05 p.m.

Observation Location: Town conservation land near Beaver Brook

Common Name: Starflower

Scientific Name: Trientalis borealis

Comments: This member of the primrose family likes moist woods. It blooms in May. Please do not dig up native wildflowers. They typically do not survive transplantation.

More Information: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture

Starflower

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/19/19

Observation Time: 2:35 p.m.

Observation Location: Billings Loop Botanical Trail

Common Name: Starflower

Scientific Name: Lysimachia borealis

Comments: Formerly known as Trientalis borealis, it has been shuffled around to new species name Lysimachia borealis (same genus as the yellow Loosestrifes) and moved to the Myrsinaceae (Myrsine) family. This member of the primrose family likes moist woods. It blooms in May. Please do not dig up native wildflowers. They typically do not survive transplantation.

More Information: Minnesota Wildflowers

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/22/18

Observation Time: 9:35 a.m.

Observation Location: Town conservation land near Beaver Brook

Common Name: Starflower

Scientific Name: Trientalis borealis

Comments: This member of the primrose family likes moist woods. It blooms in May. Please do not dig up native wildflowers. They typically do not survive transplantation.

More Information: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/27/20

Observation Time: 5:10 p.m.

Observation Location: near footbridge over Beaver Brook

Common Name: Starflower

Scientific Name: Lysimachia borealis

Comments: Formerly known as Trientalis borealis, it has been shuffled around to new species name Lysimachia borealis (same genus as the yellow Loosestrifes) and moved to the Myrsinaceae (Myrsine) family. This member of the primrose family likes moist woods. It blooms in May.

Please do not dig up native wildflowers. They typically do not survive transplantation.

More Information: Minnesota Wildflowers

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/24/10

Observation Time: 3:25 p.m.

Observation Location: Beaver Brook near tennis courts

Common Name: Swamp azalea

Scientific Name: Rhododendron viscosum

Comments: This typical wetland shrub is sometimes called the Clammy Azalea because of its very sticky corolla. The species name means sticky in Latin. The flowers appear after the leaves.

More Information: University of Texas

Swamp Azalea

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 9/22/11

Observation Time: 3:25 p.m.

Observation Location: field near Gavins Pond

Common Name: Sweet Everlasting or Rabbit Tobacco

Scientific Name: Pseudognaphalium obtusifolium

Comments: This wildflower is a member of a group of daisy-family herbs called cudweeds. Heads never open wider than this.

More Information: Wildflowers of the Southeastern US

Sweet Everlasting

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/31/10

Observation Time: 10:40 a.m.

Observation Location: Beaver Brook near tennis courts

Common Name: Sweet Pepperbush (Summersweet)

Scientific Name: Clethra alnifolia

Comments: Very fragrant.

More Information: Virginia Native Plant Society

Sweet Pepperbush (Summersweet)

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/7/18

Observation Time: 3:10 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm (TTOR)

Common Name: Tall Meadow Rue

Scientific Name:Thalictrum pubescens

Comments: Meadow rue flowers have no petals; the conspicuous part of the flower is the white filaments of the stamens.

More Information: Connecticut Botanical Society

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 8/23/15

Observation Time: 5:45 p.m.

Observation Location: bank of Hammershop Pond at Ames and Cottage Streets.

Common Name: Virginia Marsh-St. John’s wort

Scientific Name: Triadenum virginicum

Comments: Occurs only in wetlands. (Wetland indicator code: OBL).

Please do not dig up wildflowers!

More Information: Go Botany

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/6/11

Observation Time: 1:15 p.m.

Observation Location: bank of Beaver Brook (near tennis courts)

Common Name: Water Forget-Me-Not

Scientific Name: Myosotis scorpioides

Comments: Water forget-me-nots are usually found in damp or wet habitats, such as bogs, ponds, streams, ditches, fen and rivers. While it favors wet ground, it can survive submerged in water, and often can form floating rafts.

More Information: Wikipedia

Water Forget-Me-Not

Water Forget-Me-Not

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 9/12/09

Observation Time: 11:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond (near the dam)

Common Name: Water Lily

Scientific Name: Nymphaea odorata

Comments: It usually flowers only from early morning until noon. The black specks in the first photo might be black aphids.

More Information: The University of Texas at Austin

Water Lily

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/13/13

Observation Time: 11:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond

Common Name: Water Shield

Scientific Name: Brasenia schreberi

Comments: Leaf floats like a water lily, but the stem is attached in middle.

More Information: USDA Forest Service

Water Shield

Water Shield

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 8/24/09

Observation Time: 12:30 p.m.

Observation Location: Margin of wetland behind Hunter’s Ridge

Common Name: White Baneberry (a.k.a. “Doll’s Eyes”)

Scientific Name: Actaea pachypoda

Comments: Needs continuously damp soil. Seeds, which are highly toxic, were once used as eyes for rag dolls.

More Information: Dave’s Garden

White Baneberry

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 9/9/12

Observation Time: 3:15 p.m.

Observation Location: Sandy Ridge Circle

Common Name: White Baneberry, or Doll’s Eyes

Scientific Name: Actaea pachypoda

Comments: Both the berries and the entire plant are considered poisonous to humans. The berries contain cardiogenic toxins which can have an immediate sedative effect on human cardiac muscle tissue, and are the most poisonous part of the plant. Ingestion of the berries can lead to cardiac arrest and death.

The berries are harmless to birds, the plant’s primary seed dispersers.

More Information: Wikipedia

White Baneberry

White Baneberry

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 8/18/20

Observation Time: 11:50 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm (formerly the Kendall Estate)

Common Name: White Vervain

Scientific Name: Verbena urticifolia

Comments: I initially identified this plant using a cool app called Seek. Normally white vervain has green leaves, so I sent my photo of this red-leaved specimen to a botanist, who verified that it is indeed white vervain.

The name vervain is derived from the Celtic ferfaen, that is from fer (to drive away) and from faen (a stone). In early times the plant was used for afflictions of the bladder, such as kidney stones. The species name, urticifolia, means it has nettle-like leaves.

More Information: Friends of the Wildflower Garden

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 10/6/19

Observation Time: 2:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Near Beaver Brook

Common Name: White Wood Aster

Scientific Name: Eurybia divaricata

Comments: Eurybia divaricata is native to Eastern U.S. and typically grows in the wild in dry open woods. It grows in loose clumps with dark, sprawling, sometimes zigzag stems up to 2.5′ tall. Distinctive leaves are heart-shaped, stalked and coarsely toothed. Small but abundant flowers (to 1 inch across) have white rays and yellow to red center disks and appear in flat-topped, terminal clusters in late summer to early fall. Attractive to butterflies.

More information: Missouri Botanical Gardens

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/14/09

Observation Time: 11:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm, Trustees of Reservations land

Common Name: Whorled Loosestrife

Scientific Name: Lysimachia quadrifolia

More Information: Wild Flowers of Sleepy Hollow Lake

Whorled Loosestrife

3 Whorls:

Whorled Loosestrife

4 Whorls:

Whorled Loosestrife

5 Whorls:

Whorled Loosestrife

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 9/4/20

Observation Time: 1:10 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm (in the woods)

Common Name: Whorled Wood Aster

Scientific Name: Oclemena acuminata

Comments: Whorled Wood Asters are among the relatively few woodland wildflowers that bloom in late summer and early fall.

Note the pure gold-green sweat bee feeding on the blossoms.

More information: Wildflowers of the Adirondacks

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/21/16

Observation Time: 3:20 p.m.

Observation Location: Kendall Estate, Moose Hill Street

Common Name: Wild geranium

Scientific Name: Geranium maculatum

Comments: Geranium maculatum, the wild geranium, spotted geranium, or wood geranium, is a perennial plant native to woodlands of eastern North America, from southern Manitoba and southwestern Quebec south to Alabama and Georgia and west to Oklahoma and South Dakota.

More Information: Wikipedia

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/23/18

Observation Time: 9:30 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Wild geranium

Scientific Name: Geranium maculatum

Comments: Geranium maculatum, the wild geranium, spotted geranium, or wood geranium, is a perennial plant native to woodlands of eastern North America, from southern Manitoba and southwestern Quebec south to Alabama and Georgia and west to Oklahoma and South Dakota.

More Information: Wikipedia

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/26/19

Observation Time: 2:45 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm (formerly the Kendall Estate)

Common Name: Wild geranium

Scientific Name: Geranium maculatum

Comments: Geranium maculatum, the wild geranium, spotted geranium, or wood geranium, is a perennial plant native to woodlands of eastern North America.

More Information: USDA Forest Service

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/5/11

Observation Time: 3:20 p.m.

Observation Location: Kendall Estate, Moose Hill Street

Common Name: Wild geranium

Scientific Name: Geranium maculatum

Comments: Geranium maculatum, the wild geranium, spotted geranium, or wood geranium, is a perennial plant native to woodlands of eastern North America, from southern Manitoba and southwestern Quebec south to Alabama and Georgia and west to Oklahoma and South Dakota.

More Information: Wikipedia

Wild Geranium

Wild Geranium

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/6/11

Observation Time: 2:20 p.m.

Observation Location: field near Gavins Pond Dam

Common Name: Wild Indigo

Scientific Name: Baptisia australis

Comments: It is a perennial  upright bushy plant with attractive foliage. Blossoms in mid-summer are bright yellow. Seed heads turn a deep indigo color providing winter interest.

More Information: Wikipedia

Wild Indigo

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 7/22/15

Observation Time: 5:00 p.m.

Observation Location: field near Gavins Pond Dam

Common Name: Wild Indigo

Scientific Name: Baptisia australis

Comments: It is a perennial  upright bushy plant with attractive foliage and yellow blossoms. Seed heads turn a deep indigo color providing winter interest.

More Information: Wikipedia

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/9/13

Observation Time: 2:15 p.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond area

Common Name: Wild Iris

Scientific Name: Iris virginica shrevei

Comments: These gorgeous flowers bloom in spring around Sharon. These are also known as Harlequin Blueflag and Northern Blue Flag. Look for them in swamps, marshes, and wet shorelines from Virginia to Canada. Watch honeybees and native bees land on the large petal, which must look AMAZING in their ultraviolet-shifted vision, and scoot down into the nectary through the roofed-over passage. Sometimes they’ll exit on the side if they are small enough.

More Information: Backyard and Beyond

Wild Iris

Wild Iris

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/12/11

Observation Time: 8:35 a.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Road near soccer field parking lot

Common Name: Wild mustard

Scientific Name: Barbarea vulgaris Aiton

Comments: Also called yellow rocket, or early winter cress, introduced from Eurasia.

More Information: Wikipedia

Wild Mustard

Wild Mustard

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/31/20

Observation Time: 3:00 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm (TTOR)

Common Name: Wild Violet

Scientific Name: Viola odorata

Comments: V. odorata is native to Europe and Asia, but has also been introduced to North America and Australia. It is a hardy herbaceous flowering perennial.

More Information: Wikipedia

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/7/19

Observation Time: 8:00 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Wild Violet

Scientific Name: Viola odorata

Comments: V. odorata is native to Europe and Asia, but has also been introduced to North America and Australia. It is a hardy herbaceous flowering perennial.

More Information: Wikipedia

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/27/14

Observation Time: 6:50 p.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary

Common Name: Wisteria

Scientific Name: Wisteria spp.

Comments: Wisteria is a genus of flowering plants in the legume family, Fabaceae (Leguminosae), that includes ten species of woody climbing vines that are native to China, Korea, and Japan and as an introduced species to the Eastern United States.

More Information: Wikipedia

Wisteria

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/6/20

Observation Time: 9:40 a.m.

Observation Location: Moose Hill Farm (TTOR)

Common Name: Wood Anemone

Scientific Name: Anemone quinquefolia

Comments: Also called wood windflower, wood anemone is one of the earliest blooming flowers in the rich, moist forests of New England. Look for showy white flowers poking above the dissected leaves, only 3 inches (7 cm) tall. These offer food to pollinators searching for nectar early in the season. Like other anemones, wood anemone doesn’t have true petals, but petal-like sepals. Wood anemone may have four to nine sepals, most commonly five.

More Information: Go Botany

Wood anemones flowers usually have five sepals, but not always.

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 6/26/15

Observation Time: 1:40 p.m.

Observation Location: meadow near Morse and Lakeview Streets

Common Name: Yellow Hawkweed

Scientific Name: Hieracium caespitosum

Comments: Yellow hawkweed is native to Europe and was introduced as an ornamental into New York in 1879. It is now a destructive weed of pastureland. It can colonize a wide range of habitats with sandy or gravelly soils.

More Information: Go Botany

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 5/29/14

Observation Time: 12:20 p.m.

Observation Location: Borderland State Park

Common Name: Yellow star-grass

Scientific Name: Hypoxis hirsuta

Comments: Yellow star-grass is the only native wildflower with a six-petaled yellow blossom.

More Information: U.S. Wildflowers

Yellow Star-grass

Yellow Star-grass

Observer: Paul Lauenstein

Observation Date: 10/3/10

Observation Time: 9:10 a.m.

Observation Location: Gavins Pond Road

Common Name: Yellow Toadflax (a.k.a. Common Toadflax)

Scientific Name: Linaria vulgaris

Comments: Also known as butter and eggs plant or wild snapdragon, this invasive perennial weed from Eurasia thrives in poor soil where there is little competition from larger plants.

More Information: Wikipedia

Yellow Toadflax